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Hurling yourself headfirst into healthy hobbies?

Hordes of high-spirited, heart-pumping sports starting with “H” provide heaps of happiness!

Hop on and hold tight, as we dive into a haven of hankering sports enthusiasts’ hardy exploits!

Sports that start with the Letter H

  1. Hockey
  2. Hiking
  3. Horse racing
  4. Hip hop dance
  5. Half marathon
  6. Handball
  7. Hurling
  8. Heptathlon
  9. Highland games
  10. Hapkido

#1 Hockey

Hockey

Hockey, comprising of field hockey and ice hockey, has a rich history dating back to ancient Greece, Egypt, and Persia.

Primarily popular in European, North American, and Asian countries, the sport has gained massive attention worldwide.

Field hockey became an Olympic sport in 1908, while ice hockey made its debut in 1920.

Numerous competitions, like the Ice Hockey World Championships and the Hockey Champions Trophy, attract hoards of fans every year.

#2 Hiking

Hiking

Hiking, an outdoor recreational activity, traces its origins to early human history when people trekked through uncharted territories.

While widely popular across the globe, hiking is particularly prevalent in regions with expansive natural landscapes like the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand.

Though not an Olympic sport, hiking contributes significantly to the booming adventure tourism industry.

#3 Horse racing

Horse racing

Rooted in ancient civilizations like Egypt, Greece, and Rome, horse racing thrills millions of enthusiasts worldwide.

This equestrian sport ranks high in popularity across the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, and France, and famous horse racing events, such as the Kentucky Derby, Royal Ascot, and Melbourne Cup, draw massive crowds.

#4 Hip hop dance

Hip hop dance

Hip hop dance, as part of the larger hip hop culture, originated in the 1970s from New York City’s African American and Latinx communities.

Booming in popularity, particularly in the United States, the UK, and Japan, the dance style has garnered recognition in major televised dance competitions like World of Dance and several global championships.

#5 Half marathon

Half marathon

Half-marathons (13.1 miles or 21.0975 km) emerged in popularity during the 20th century, as interest in long-distance running grew.

Today, half-marathons are popular worldwide, with substantial participants and spectators in events such as the Great North Run, EDP Lisbon Half Marathon, and NYC Half.

Although not an Olympic event, this distance showcases runners’ endurance and dedication.

#6 Handball

Handball

Handball, a fast-paced team sport, originated in the late 19th century in northern Europe (Germany, Denmark, and Sweden).

The game enjoys immense popularity in Europe, with the IHF World Men’s Handball Championship and the EHF Champions League being iconic international events.

Handball became an Olympic sport in 1936 (outdoor) and 1972 (indoor).

#7 Hurling

Hurling

Hurling, an ancient Irish sport, dates back over 3000 years.

A fast-paced field game gains remarkable traction in Ireland and has a dedicated following worldwide, especially among the Irish diaspora.

The All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship stands as a premier competition in the sport, and while not an Olympic event, hurling persists as an integral aspect of Irish culture and heritage.

#8 Heptathlon

Heptathlon, comprising seven track and field events, emerged as a women’s sport in the 20th century. Global heptathlon stars compete in notable events like the World Athletics Championships and the Olympics.

The sport debuted as an Olympic event for women in 1984 (replacing the pentathlon), and since then, several heptathletes, including Jackie Joyner-Kersee and Carolina KlΓΌft, have left their mark on history.

#9 Highland games

Highland games

With deep Scottish roots, the Highland games, a centuries-old traditional sports festival, showcases physical strength and agility through entertaining events like the caber toss and hammer throw.

Today, the games captivate audiences globally, especially those of Scottish descent. Although not part of the Olympics, the Highland games serve as enduring symbols of Scottish culture and societal bonds.

#10 Hapkido

Hapkido

Hapkido, a Korean martial art tracing back to the mid-20th century, emphasizes self-defense techniques that employ joint locks, throws, and kicks.

The sport has gained recognition worldwide, especially in North and South America, Europe, and Australasia.

While not an Olympic event, Hapkido has carved a niche among martial arts enthusiasts as an efficient defense exercise and an engaging sport.

More Sports with H

  1. Hammer throw: A field event featuring athletes hurling a spherical-shaped metal ball attached to a wire handle. Hammer throw gained acceptance as an Olympic sport in 1900, and the sport continues to showcase the competitors’ strength and skill in various tournaments.
  2. Hand cycling: An adaptive sport designed for people with disabilities, hand cycling enables athletes to propel themselves using hand-powered bikes. This inclusive sport has gained global popularity and is a significant event at the Paralympic Games and World Championships.
  3. Heavyweight boxing: With roots dating back to ancient civilizations, heavyweight boxing gained prominence in 18th century England. Today, the sport is globally popular, with iconic champions such as Muhammad Ali and Mike Tyson etching their names in its history.
  4. Horseball: Originating in Argentina, horseball blends elements of rugby, basketball, and equestrian sports. Though not an Olympic sport, this high-adrenaline game is played professionally and recreationally in Europe and South America, with annual championships drawing participants and fans alike.
  5. Headis: A unique German-origin sport that combines table tennis and soccer, Headis challenges athletes to hit a ball across a table using only their head. Gaining rapid popularity across Europe and beyond, the sport hosts international and national competitions.
  6. Hammer wrestling: An obscure, traditional German sport, also known as Hammerschlagen or Nagelspielen, where competitors take turns pounding nails into a large wooden block. The player who accomplishes this task first using the narrow side of a hammerhead emerges as the victor.
  7. Hockey polo: A variant of traditional polo that substitutes polo sticks with ice hockey sticks, Hockey polo enhances the thrill and challenge of the game. Currently a niche sport, it has potential for growth in countries where polo and ice hockey are popular.
  8. Horseshoe pitching: A popular recreational activity and competitive sport dating back to Roman times, horseshoe pitching involves players taking turns tossing horseshoes at a stake in the ground. The sport hosts organized events, such as the World Horseshoe Pitching Championships, drawing participants and spectators worldwide.
  9. Hang gliding: Pioneered in the 1960s, hang gliding is an exhilarating air sport that involves flying an unpowered aircraft. While not an Olympic sport, hang gliding competitions exist, attracting thrill-seekers from around the globe, and significantly contribute to adventure tourism.
  10. Hopscotch: A popular children’s game with origins dating back to ancient Rome, hopscotch involves hopping, jumping, and balancing on one foot through a drawn pattern on the ground. As a recreational activity, it contributes to children’s physical and mental development worldwide.
  11. Hitting for the cycle: A rare baseball accomplishment where a batter hits a single, double, triple, and home run in a single game. Though not a standalone sport, this impressive feat speaks to a player’s exceptional skill and stands out as a memorable moment in a baseball competition.
  12. Hardcourt bike polo: A modern urban adaptation of traditional polo, hardcourt bike polo is played on a hard surface with players mounted on bicycles. Gaining popularity worldwide, this fast-paced, inclusive sport boasts its tournaments, such as the World Hardcourt Bike Polo Championships.
  13. Hoop rolling: Combining skill and amusing competition, hoop rolling is a game that entails participants pushing a hoop forward using a stick. Widely popular as a traditional historic pastime, it survives today as a fun recreational activity enjoyed by children and adults alike.
  14. Hula hoop: An iconic toy and recreational activity where participants twirl a hoop around their waist, hula hoops trace back to ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Native American cultures. With worldwide recognition, hula hooping has transformed from a fun pastime to a fitness-promoting activity in recent years.
  15. Hacksack: Also known as footbag, this modern sport challenges players to keep a small round bag off the ground using their feet and other body parts, excluding hands and arms. With a dedicated global following, hacksack competitions, like the Footbag World Championships, showcase players’ agility and creativity.

FAQ

Which sports start with the letter H?

Some of the sports that start with the letter H include Hockey, Hiking, Horse racing, Hip hop dance, Half marathon, Handball, Hurling, Heptathlon, Highland games, Hapkido, Hammer throw, Hand cycling, Heavyweight boxing, Horseball, Headis, Hammer wrestling, Hockey polo, Horseshoe pitching, Hang gliding, and Hopscotch.

What is the most popular sport that starts with H?

Hockey, comprising of field hockey and ice hockey, is arguably the most popular sport that starts with the letter H. It is played by millions of participants worldwide and enjoys significant recognition for its fast-paced gameplay, team spirit, and global competitions such as the Ice Hockey World Championships and the Hockey Champions Trophy.

I'm a sports enthusiast who loves all kinds of ball and water sports. I run stand-up-paddling.org (#1 German Paddleboarding Blog), played competitive Badminton, took part in the German Mini Golf Championships, started learning 'real' Golf and dabbled in dozens of other sports & activities.

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