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Hey there, sports lovers!

Are you ready to discover the world of girl sports?

Jump into our girl sports list, sorted by popularity!

From experienced athletes to energetic beginners, there’s something here for everyone to enjoy and excel in!

#1 Soccer

Soccer

Soccer, also known as football, is believed to have originated in various forms throughout history, with evidence dating as far back as 2500 BCE in ancient China. The modern form of soccer was established in England in the 19th century.

Today, soccer is the most popular sport globally, with an estimated 4 billion fans. The FIFA World Cup, held every four years, is the most prestigious tournament in soccer.

Women’s soccer has gained immense popularity, with the FIFA Women’s World Cup taking place since 1991.

#2 Basketball

Basketball

Basketball was invented in 1891 by Canadian physical education instructor James Naismith in Springfield, Massachusetts, USA. It has grown to be one of the most popular sports worldwide, especially in the United States.

The Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) debuted in 1997, providing a professional platform for female athletes. Women’s basketball became an Olympic sport in 1976.

#3 Tennis

Tennis

Tennis traces its origins back to 12th-century France, where it was played with a ball and the palm of the hand. The modern version was developed in England during the 1800s.

Tennis is a popular sport worldwide, with major tournaments like Wimbledon, the French Open, the US Open, and the Australian Open. Women’s tennis is highly competitive, with greats like Serena Williams and Martina Navratilova dominating the sport for years.

Tennis has been featuring women’s singles and doubles events in the Olympics since 1900.

#4 Volleyball

Volleyball

Volleyball was created in 1895 by American William G. Morgan as a blend of basketball, baseball, tennis, and handball. Today, it is played worldwide and is popular among women, especially in the United States, Brazil, and Russia.

The FΓ©dΓ©ration Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB) oversees the sport, and women’s volleyball has been an Olympic sport since 1964.

#5 Swimming

Swimming

Swimming has a long history, with early evidence dating back to 7,000 BCE during the Stone Age. It is a popular sport worldwide, with competitive events held internationally.

The International Swimming Federation (FINA) governs the sport, and women’s swimming has been a part of the Olympic program since 1912.

#6 Gymnastics

Gymnastics

Gymnastics dates back to ancient Greece, where it was originally developed as a form of physical exercise. Today, gymnastics is an immensely popular sport worldwide, especially among women.

The International Gymnastics Federation (FIG) oversees the sport, and women’s gymnastics has been an Olympic sport since 1928, with the first women’s apparatus event (balance beam) taking place in Amsterdam.

#7 Track and Field

Track and Field

Track and Field, also known as Athletics, has its roots in various ancient civilizations, including Greece, Rome, and Egypt. Today, it is a popular sport worldwide, with events ranging from sprints to long-distance races and various field events.

Women’s Track and Field became part of the Olympic program in 1928, and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) governs the sport.

#8 Softball

Softball

Softball was invented in 1887 by George Hancock in Chicago, USA, as an indoor variant of baseball. The sport gained popularity in the United States and later spread globally.

The International Softball Federation (ISF) governs the sport, and women’s softball was introduced as an Olympic sport in 1996, with the last Olympic appearance in 2008. However, it returned in the 2020 Tokyo Games.

#9 Figure Skating

Figure Skating

Figure Skating has its origin in the European winter activity of ice skating, dating back to the 13th century. Today, it is a popular sport among women worldwide, with notable skaters like Michelle Kwan and Yuna Kim captivating audiences.

The International Skating Union (ISU) oversees the sport, and women’s figure skating has been part of the Olympic program since 1908.

#10 Dance

Dance

Dance is a diverse form of art and sport, with origins tracing back to ancient civilizations worldwide. Today, different dance styles such as ballet, contemporary, and hip-hop are practiced globally.

Dance competitions, such as the World DanceSport Federation (WDSF) World Championships, showcase the talent of female dancers. Dance is not an Olympic sport, but it is highly popular among girls and women of all ages as a recreational and competitive activity.

More Sports with Girl

  1. Cheerleading: Originating in the United States in the late 1800s, cheerleading began as an all-male activity, later evolving to include female participants. It is popular in North America and has gained popularity globally. Cheerleading involves a combination of dance, acrobatics, and stunts, and competitive cheerleading events are held worldwide, such as the ICU World Championships. It is not an Olympic sport but is recognized by the International Olympic Committee.
  2. Field Hockey: Field hockey’s roots can be traced back to ancient Greece, Egypt, and India. Today, it is popular in Europe, Asia, and Oceania. The International Hockey Federation (FIH) governs the sport, and women’s field hockey has been played in the Olympics since 1980.
  3. Lacrosse: Lacrosse was initially played by Native American tribes and later adapted by European settlers. It is highly popular in North America, especially in the United States and Canada. The Federation of International Lacrosse (FIL) oversees the sport. Women’s lacrosse has not yet been included in the Olympic program.
  4. Golf: Golf’s origins can be traced back to 15th-century Scotland. It is popular worldwide, with major tournaments such as the Women’s British Open and the LPGA Championship. The sport returned to the Olympic program in 2016, with separate events for men and women.
  5. Cycling: Cycling has its origins in 19th-century Europe and has grown in popularity across the globe. Women’s cycling events include road races, track cycling, and mountain biking. Women’s cycling has been part of the Olympic program since 1984.
  6. Ice Hockey: Ice hockey was developed in 19th-century Canada and is now popular in North America and Europe. The International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) governs the sport, and women’s ice hockey has been an Olympic sport since 1998.
  7. Skiing: Skiing has ancient origins, dating back over 4,000 years in various regions, including Scandinavia and Central Asia. It is popular in countries with snowy mountainous regions, such as Austria, France, and the United States. Women’s skiing competitions include alpine skiing, cross-country skiing, and freestyle skiing and have been part of the Winter Olympics since the 1920s and 1930s.
  8. Snowboarding: Snowboarding was developed in the United States during the 1960s, combining elements of surfing and skiing. It is popular in countries with snowy mountains, such as the United States, Canada, and Japan. Women’s snowboarding events have been part of the Winter Olympics since 1998.
  9. Equestrian: Equestrian sports have roots in ancient civilizations and include disciplines such as dressage, show jumping, and eventing. It is popular worldwide, particularly in Europe, North America, and Australia. Women’s equestrian events have been part of the Olympic program since 1952.
  10. Rugby: Rugby was developed in 19th-century England and has grown in popularity worldwide. Women’s rugby includes both rugby union and rugby sevens. Women’s rugby sevens made its Olympic debut in the 2016 Rio Games. Rugby Union has its major international Women’s Rugby World Cup tournament.
  11. Surfing: Surfing has its origins in ancient Polynesian culture, particularly in Hawaii. Today, it is popular in countries with coastlines offering good wave conditions, such as the USA, Australia, and Brazil. Women’s surfing has gained popularity in recent years, with the World Surf League (WSL) holding annual Championship Tours. Surfing made its Olympic debut, including women’s events, in the 2020 Tokyo Games.
  12. Rowing: Rowing dates back to ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman civilizations. It is popular worldwide on rivers, lakes, and coastal areas. Women’s rowing has been part of the Olympic program since the 1976 Montreal Games.
  13. Cross Country: Cross country running has its origins in the early 19th-century England. It is a popular sport worldwide, with events ranging from regional to international levels. Women’s cross country has been part of the Olympic program since 1984.
  14. Diving: Diving as a sport evolved from gymnastics in the late 19th century in Europe, particularly in Sweden and Germany. It is popular across the globe, especially in countries with strong aquatic programs, such as China, Australia, and the United States. Women’s diving has been an Olympic sport since 1912.
  15. Water Polo: Water polo was developed in the late 19th century in both England and Scotland. It is popular worldwide, particularly in Europe, North America, and Australia. Women’s water polo was introduced in the Olympic program in 2000 during the Sydney Games.
  16. Synchronized Swimming: Synchronized swimming, combining swimming, dance, and gymnastics, originated in the late 19th century in the United Kingdom and Canada. It is popular worldwide, with countries such as Russia, the United States, and Japan dominating the sport. Women’s synchronized swimming has been part of the Olympic program since 1984, with both duet and team events in the competition.
  17. Badminton: Badminton traces its origins back to ancient India, where a similar game was played with a shuttlecock and rackets. Modern badminton was developed in England in the 19th century. It is particularly popular in Asia, especially China, Indonesia, and India. Women’s badminton has been part of the Olympic program since the 1992 Barcelona Games.
  18. Table Tennis: Table tennis was developed in late 19th-century England as a recreation of lawn tennis played indoors. It is popular worldwide, particularly in Asia, with powerhouses like China, Japan, and South Korea dominating the sport. Women’s table tennis has been part of the Olympic program since 1988.
  19. Fencing: Fencing has its origins in Europe dating back to medieval times as a practice of swordsmanship. It is popular worldwide, with European countries like Italy, France, and Hungary dominating the sport. Women’s fencing has been part of the Olympic program since 1924.
  20. Archery: Archery has its roots in ancient civilizations, such as Egypt and Babylon, primarily used for hunting and warfare. Today, it is a popular sport worldwide. Women’s archery has been part of the Olympic program since 1904, with a hiatus between 1920 and 1972 before its permanent return.
  21. Taekwondo: Taekwondo is a Korean martial art that evolved from ancient martial arts and modern influences. It is practiced globally, with countries like South Korea, China, and the United States being powerhouses in the sport. Women’s taekwondo made its Olympic debut in the 2000 Sydney Games.
  22. Karate: Karate is a Japanese martial art that evolved from the combination of indigenous and Chinese martial arts. It has grown popular worldwide, with numerous tournaments held annually. Women’s karate events were included in the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games for the first time.
  23. Judo: Judo, another Japanese martial art, was developed by Jigoro Kano in the late 19th century, adapting techniques from traditional Japanese martial arts. It is popular globally, and women’s judo has been part of the Olympic program since the 1992 Barcelona Games.
  24. Wrestling: Wrestling has ancient origins, practiced in various civilizations worldwide. It is popular as both freestyle and Greco-Roman disciplines. Women’s freestyle wrestling has been part of the Olympic program since the 2004 Athens Games.
  25. Boxing: Boxing traces its roots to ancient civilizations, such as Egypt and Greece. The modern form of the sport developed in England during the 18th and 19th centuries. Women’s boxing was introduced to the Olympic program in the 2012 London Games.
  26. Kickboxing: Kickboxing was developed in the 20th century, combining elements of boxing and traditional martial arts. It is popular worldwide, with numerous regional and international competitions. The sport is not part of the Olympic program but is widely practiced by girls and women as a form of self-defense and competitive activity.
  27. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) was developed in the 20th century by the Gracie family in Brazil, adapting techniques from Kodokan Judo. It has grown in popularity worldwide, particularly among women. BJJ has not yet been included in the Olympic program but has numerous competitions, including the World BJJ Championships for women.
  28. Aerial Sports: Aerial sports include disciplines like artistic and rhythmic gymnastics on aerial apparatuses such as silks, hoops, and trapeze. These sports have gained popularity worldwide, with competitions like the Aerial Hoop World Series and the World Pole Dance Championship. Aerial sports are not currently part of the Olympic program but are enjoyed by girls and women globally.
  29. Ultimate Frisbee: Ultimate frisbee was invented in the United States in the 1960s, combining elements of football, soccer, and basketball. It is played by teams of seven players, with a focus on fair play and self-officiation. The sport is popular in North America, Europe, and Asia, and there are numerous women’s competitions, such as the World Ultimate Club Championships. Ultimate frisbee is not yet an Olympic sport.
  30. Netball: Netball is a team sport that evolved from early basketball in England during the late 19th century. It is especially popular in British Commonwealth nations, such as Australia, New Zealand, and England. Women’s netball showcases some of the greatest female athletes globally, with competitions like the INF Netball World Cup and the Commonwealth Games.
  31. Cricket: Cricket’s origins go back to England in the 16th century, and today it is popular worldwide, particularly in Commonwealth countries. Women’s cricket has grown in popularity, with the International Cricket Council (ICC) organizing tournaments like the Women’s Cricket World Cup. Women’s cricket has not yet been included in the Olympic program.
  32. Triathlon: The triathlon, combining swimming, cycling, and running, was developed in the United States in the 1970s. It is popular worldwide, with the International Triathlon Union (ITU) governing the sport. Women’s triathlon has been part of the Olympic program since the 2000 Sydney Games.
  33. Marathon: Marathons have their origins in ancient Greece, commemorating the legendary run of Pheidippides from Marathon to Athens. Today, marathons are held across the globe, and women’s marathons have been part of the Olympics since 1984.
  34. Canoeing: Canoeing is an ancient practice dating back thousands of years and developed as a means of transport in various cultures. It is popular worldwide, and women’s canoeing has been part of the Olympics since 1948, with the addition of more disciplines over the years.
  35. Kayaking: Like canoeing, kayaking has its roots in ancient cultures as a means of transport. It is popular worldwide, and women’s kayaking events have been part of the Olympic program since 1948, with various disciplines like sprint and slalom.
  36. Rafting: Rafting is a thrilling water sport that gained popularity in the 20th century as an outdoor recreational activity. While rafting itself is not part of the Olympic program, women around the world engage in this exhilarating sport, navigating through challenging rapids and river conditions.
  37. Skateboarding: Skateboarding was developed in the United States during the 1940s and 1950s, becoming popular worldwide. Women’s skateboarding made its Olympic debut in the 2020 Tokyo Games.
  38. Inline Skating: Inline skating emerged in the 1980s, with roots in earlier roller skating traditions. It is popular worldwide as both a recreational activity and a racing sport. Inline speed skating is not part of the Olympic program, but women participate in racing events such as the Inline Speed Skating World Championships.
  39. Squash: Squash was developed from earlier racket sports in England during the 19th century. It is popular across the globe, and women compete in international events such as the Women’s World Squash Championships. Squash is not yet an Olympic sport.
  40. Archery: Archery dates back to ancient civilizations and has been practiced for hunting, warfare, and sport. It is popular worldwide, with South Korea, the United States, and European countries currently dominating the sport. Women’s archery has been part of the Olympic program since 1904, with more regular participation since 1972.
  41. Taekwondo: Taekwondo is a Korean martial art that was developed in the mid-20th century. It is popular worldwide, and women’s taekwondo has been part of the Olympic program since the 2000 Sydney Games.
  42. Karate: Karate is a Japanese martial art that developed in the Ryukyu Kingdom, which is now part of modern Japan. It is popular worldwide, and women’s karate made its Olympic debut in the 2020 Tokyo Games.
  43. Judo: Judo is a Japanese martial art founded by Jigoro Kano in the late 19th century. It is practiced globally and has been an Olympic sport for women since the 1992 Barcelona Games.
  44. Wrestling: Wrestling has ancient origins, with roots in various civilizations and cultures. It is popular worldwide, with women’s wrestling becoming part of the Olympic program in 2004.
  45. Boxing: Boxing has origins dating back to ancient Greece and Rome. It is a popular sport worldwide, and women’s boxing was introduced in the Olympic program in 2012.
  46. Kickboxing: Kickboxing is a hybrid martial art that combines elements of boxing and karate. It originated in the 1950s in Japan and is popular worldwide. Though not an Olympic sport, women’s kickboxing has seen growth in recent years, with events like the World Association of Kickboxing Organizations (WAKO) World Championships.
  47. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu was developed in the 20th century through the adaptation of Japanese Judo practices by the Gracie family in Brazil. The martial art focuses on ground fighting and submission techniques. It is popular worldwide but has not yet become part of the Olympic program. Women’s Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu competitions are held globally, such as the International Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Federation (IBJJF) World Championships.
  48. Aerial Sports: Aerial sports include various acrobatic disciplines performed in the air, such as aerial silks, trapeze, and lyra (aerial hoop). These sports have roots in circus arts, and aerial sports for women have gained popularity in recent years as both a recreational and competitive activity.
  49. Ultimate Frisbee: Ultimate Frisbee was invented in the 1960s in the United States. It is a non-contact team sport that combines elements of American football, soccer, and basketball, using a flying disc (Frisbee). Women’s ultimate frisbee has grown in popularity, with national and international competitions, including the WFDF World Ultimate Championships. It is not an Olympic sport.
  50. Netball: Netball is a sport derived from early versions of basketball and was developed in the late 19th century in England. It is primarily played by women and is particularly popular in the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand. The International Netball Federation (INF) organizes the Netball World Cup, held every four years.
  51. Cricket: Cricket originated in the 16th century in England and is now popular worldwide, especially in countries such as India, Australia, and the United Kingdom. Women’s cricket has grown in popularity, with the International Cricket Council (ICC) organizing the Women’s Cricket World Cup since 1973.
  52. Triathlon: Triathlon is a multi-sport event that combines swimming, cycling, and running. It originated in the United States in the 1970s and is now popular globally. Women’s triathlon has been part of the Olympic program since 2000.
  53. Marathon: Marathon running traces its roots back to ancient Greece, with the modern marathon established in the late 19th century. Marathons are popular worldwide, and the Women’s Marathon has been part of the Olympic program since 1984.
  54. Canoeing: Canoeing is a water sport in which athletes paddle in small boats called canoes. It is popular on calm lakes, rivers, and coastal areas for recreational and competitive purposes. Women’s canoeing events have been part of the Olympic program since 1948.
  55. Kayaking: Kayaking is a water sport where participants propel themselves in a small, narrow boat called a kayak using a double-bladed paddle. It is popular in rivers, lakes, and coastal areas, with various types of kayaking, including whitewater, sea, and recreational. Women’s kayaking events have been an Olympic sport since 1948.
  56. Rafting: Rafting is a thrilling water sport where participants navigate a raft through rough waters, typically in whitewater river conditions. It is popular in regions with fast-flowing rivers, such as the Colorado River in the USA and the Zambezi River in Africa. Women’s rafting competitions are held globally, including the International Rafting Federation (IRF) World Rafting Championships.
  57. Skateboarding: Skateboarding originated in the United States in the 1950s and quickly gained popularity worldwide. Women’s skateboarding events have grown in recent years, and skateboarding made its Olympic debut, including women’s events, in the 2020 Tokyo Games.
  58. Inline Skating: Inline skating, also known as rollerblading, was developed in the 1980s and gained popularity in the United States and Europe. Women’s inline skating competitions include aggressive inline skating, speed skating, and freestyle slalom. Inline skating has not yet been included in the Olympic program, but women’s events are held at the World Roller Games.
  59. Squash: Squash was invented in the 19th century in England as a variant of racquetball. It is played globally and has a strong following in countries such as England, Egypt, and Australia. Women’s squash competitions have been held since the early 20th century, with major events like the Women’s World Squash Championships. Squash is not an Olympic sport.

FAQ

What are the most popular girl sports?

The most popular girl sports include soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, swimming, gymnastics, track and field, softball, figure skating, and dance. Other popular sports for girls include cheerleading, field hockey, and lacrosse.

How many different girl sports are mentioned in the list?

Our girl sports list features a total of 69 unique sports suitable and popular among girls and women.

I'm a sports enthusiast who loves all kinds of ball and water sports. I run stand-up-paddling.org (#1 German Paddleboarding Blog), played competitive Badminton, took part in the German Mini Golf Championships, started learning 'real' Golf and dabbled in dozens of other sports & activities.

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