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Greetings, combat sports fans!

Ready to rumble with the world’s most thrilling combative disciplines?

Explore our combat sport list, ranked by popularity.

From ultimate martial arts masters to aspiring fighters, there’s a combative challenge waiting for everyone!

#1 Boxing

Boxing

Boxing, one of the oldest and most popular combat sports, traces its roots to ancient civilizations such as Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Greece. Its modern form took shape in 18th century England.

Today, boxing enjoys worldwide popularity, with famous tournaments like the World Boxing Association (WBA) Championships, World Boxing Council (WBC) Championships, and the International Boxing Federation (IBF) Championships.

Boxing became an Olympic sport in the 1904 St. Louis Games, showcasing the skills of amateur boxers globally.

#2 Mixed Martial Arts (MMA)

Mixed Martial Arts

Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport that combines techniques from various martial arts such as wrestling, boxing, judo, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

Although ancient civilizations had similar combat contests, MMA gained modern recognition in the 1990s with the establishment of the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC).

MMA has seen rapid global popularity, with promotions like Bellator and ONE Championship also gaining prominence. Though not an Olympic sport, MMA holds numerous world championships annually, attracting fighters and fans alike.

#3 Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ)

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) was developed in the early 20th century by the Gracie family of Brazil, inspired by Japanese Jujutsu and Judo. Focused on ground fighting and submission techniques, BJJ gained popularity in the 1990s with the rise of MMA competitions, particularly the UFC.

Today, BJJ is practiced worldwide, with major tournaments such as the International Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Federation (IBJJF) World Championship and the Abu Dhabi Combat Club (ADCC) Submission Wrestling World Championship. BJJ is not an Olympic sport but remains highly influential in modern combat sports.

#4 Muay Thai

Muay Thai

Muay Thai, known as the “Art of Eight Limbs,” originated in ancient Siam (modern-day Thailand) as a military martial art. Developed around the 14th century, Muay Thai uses punches, kicks, elbows, and knee strikes to inflict damage on opponents.

Widely popular in Thailand and attracting global attention, the World Muaythai Council (WMC) and International Federation of Muaythai Associations (IFMA) govern the sport.

Muay Thai hasn’t made it into the Olympics, but the sport is featured in events like the IFMA World Muaythai Championships and the King’s Cup.

#5 Wrestling

Wrestling

Wrestling, a grappling-based combat sport with origins in ancient Greece, Egypt, and Mesopotamia, involves pinning or throwing an opponent to the ground.

Freestyle and Greco-Roman wrestling are the most famous styles, with the former allowing the use of legs in offense and defense, while the latter forbids holds below the waist.

Wrestling has been a part of the modern Olympic Games since 1896, governed by the United World Wrestling (UWW). Top wrestling competitions include the UWW World Wrestling Championships and the NCAA Wrestling Championships in the United States.

#6 Judo

Judo

Judo, a Japanese martial art founded by Jigoro Kano in 1882, emphasizes throws, grappling, and submission techniques. Evolving from traditional Jujutsu, Judo focuses on leveraging an opponent’s strength and movement to gain an advantage.

The International Judo Federation (IJF) is the governing body for Judo. The sport gained Olympic status in the 1964 Tokyo Games, showcasing elite Judokas globally.

Major Judo tournaments include the IJF World Judo Championships and the European Judo Championships.

#7 Kickboxing

Kickboxing

Kickboxing is a hybrid combat sport combining elements of boxing, karate, and other martial arts. Originating in Japan in the 1960s, kickboxing gained momentum in the 1970s in North America, popularized by organizations like the Professional Karate Association (PKA).

Kickboxing combines punches and kicks, and is practiced for self-defense, fitness, and competition.

The sport is not part of the Olympic program, but major tournaments like the International Kickboxing Federation (IKF) World Championships and the World Association of Kickboxing Organizations (WAKO) World Championships take place annually.

#8 Taekwondo

Taekwondo, a Korean martial art dating back to the early Goguryeo Dynasty (37 BCE–668 CE), emphasizes high, fast kicks and jumping and spinning techniques.

Modern Taekwondo emerged in the 1940s and 1950s, with the World Taekwondo (WT) and the International Taekwon-Do Federation (ITF) serving as governing bodies.

Taekwondo became an Olympic sport in the 2000 Sydney Games, promoting the Korean martial art globally. Key Taekwondo tournaments include the WT World Taekwondo Championships and ITF Taekwon-Do World Championships.

#9 Karate

Karate

Karate, originating in Okinawa (now part of Japan), is a striking-based martial art developed in the early 20th century. It combines aspects of indigenous Okinawan fighting styles and Chinese martial arts, emphasizing punches, kicks, knee strikes, and open-hand techniques.

Since the World Karate Federation (WKF) is the sport’s governing body, Karate has grown popular globally. Karate made its Olympic debut in the 2020 Tokyo Games.

The WKF World Championships and the European Karate Championships are significant events in the Karate world.

#10 Sambo

Sambo, a Russian martial art developed in the early 20th century by Viktor Spiridonov and Vasili Oshchepkov, combines elements of judo and native Russian wrestling styles. Sambo focuses on throws, groundwork, and submissions, with two primary styles: Sport Sambo and Combat Sambo.

The sport is governed by the Federation International of Amateur Sambo (FIAS). Although Sambo is not an Olympic sport, it holds major competitions, including the FIAS World Sambo Championships and European Sambo Championships.

More Combat Sports

  1. Krav Maga: Developed in the 1930s by Slovakian-Israeli martial artist Imi Lichtenfeld, Krav Maga is a hybrid self-defense system originating in Israel. Combining elements of boxing, wrestling, judo, and street fighting, Krav Maga has become popular worldwide for its practical self-defense techniques and its use by military and law enforcement agencies.
  2. Kung Fu: Originating in ancient China, Kung Fu is a broad term encompassing various Chinese martial arts. Kung Fu became globally popular in the 20th century with the rise of martial arts cinema, particularly movies featuring legends like Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan. Kung Fu emphasizes forms and techniques for self-defense, meditation, and personal development. The World Wushu Championships is a leading Kung Fu competition.
  3. Sumo: An ancient Japanese sport with origins dating back to the 8th century, Sumo wrestling showcases massive athletes attempting to push or throw one another out of a circular ring. Sumo is deeply rooted in Japan’s culture and Shinto practices. It isn’t an Olympic sport but holds major tournaments throughout the year, including the six Grand Sumo tournaments (honbasho).
  4. Capoeira: A martial art originating in Brazil in the 16th century during the time of African slavery, Capoeira combines fighting techniques with music, dance, and acrobatics. Capoeira emphasizes fluid, evasive movements and incorporates a unique cultural experience. The sport is popular in Brazil and regions with a significant Afro-Brazilian population.
  5. Savate: Developed in France in the 19th century, Savate, or French kickboxing, is a striking-based martial art that emphasizes kicks and punches. Savate competitions require fighters to wear specialized footwear, distinguishing it from other kickboxing disciplines. The International Savate Federation (FISav) governs the sport, and major tournaments include the World Savate Championships and European Savate Championships.
  6. Hapkido: A Korean martial art that emerged in the 1940s, Hapkido focuses on joint locks, throws, and powerful strikes. It combines elements of Taekwondo, Judo, and Jujitsu. Although not as widely popular as Taekwondo, Hapkido is practiced in Korea and countries with a significant Korean cultural influence.
  7. Kyokushin Karate: Founded in Japan in the 1960s by Masutatsu Oyama, Kyokushin Karate emphasizes full-contact sparring, powerful strikes, and intense training. Kyokushin is considered one of the toughest styles of Karate, with practitioners known for their rigorous conditioning and formidable fighting abilities. The Kyokushin World Tournament and All Japan Open Tournament are significant events in Kyokushin Karate.
  8. Sanda: Also known as Sanshou, Sanda is a Chinese martial art developed by the Chinese military in the 20th century. Combining elements of Kung Fu, Shuai Jiao, and boxing, Sanda emphasizes striking, throws, and takedowns. It is a popular sport in China and holds competitions, such as the World Wushu Championships and the Sanda World Cup.
  9. Pankration: An ancient Greek martial art that combines boxing and wrestling techniques, Pankration was first introduced in the Greek Olympic Games in 648 BCE. Though Pankration has historical roots, contemporary versions of the sport have competed in events such as the International Pankration Championship and the Modern Pankration European Championships.
  10. Eskrima: Originating in the Philippines, Eskrima, or Arnis, is a weapons-based martial art focusing on sticks, knives, and improvised weapons. Eskrima is the national sport of the Philippines and has gained some popularity outside the country. The World Eskrima Kali Arnis Federation (WEKAF) governs the sport, and the World Arnis Championships is a significant event.
  11. Shootboxing: Founded in Japan in the 1980s, Shootboxing combines elements of kickboxing, Muay Thai, and grappling, allowing fighters to use standing submissions and throws in addition to strikes. While not as widely known as other combat sports, Shootboxing has a dedicated following in Japan, where the annual Shootboxing World Tournament takes place.
  12. Lethwei: Also known as Burmese bare-knuckle boxing, Lethwei originated in Myanmar and dates back over a thousand years. Lethwei allows a wide range of striking techniques, including headbutts, and is considered one of the most intense and ferocious combat sports. The Myanmar Traditional Lethwei Championship and The Golden Belt Championship are key tournaments held within this sport.
  13. San Shou: San Shou, also known as Chinese kickboxing or Sanda, is a modern Chinese martial art and combat sport that combines striking, kicking, throwing, and grappling techniques. Developed by the Chinese military, it is widely popular in China. The World Wushu Championships is the main event for San Shou practitioners.
  14. Taido: Created in Japan in 1965 by Seiken Shukumine, Taido is a martial art focusing on dynamic movements, evasion, and versatile striking techniques. Although not as popular as other martial arts, Taido holds competitions such as the Taido World Championships and the European Taido Championships.
  15. Wushu: Wushu is a modern Chinese martial art consisting of various traditional Kung Fu styles. Today, Wushu is a popular performance and competitive sport, often featuring dramatic forms and acrobatics. Major Wushu events include the World Wushu Championships and the Asian Wushu Championships.
  16. Wing Chun: Originating in southern China in the 18th century, Wing Chun is a close-range Kung Fu style emphasizing speed, efficiency, and practical self-defense techniques. Popularized by Bruce Lee, Wing Chun has spread globally and inspired the International Wing Chun Organization (IWCO) to oversee competitions and promote the art.
  17. Jeet Kune Do: Developed by Bruce Lee in the 1960s, Jeet Kune Do is a hybrid martial art combining techniques from multiple disciplines, including Kung Fu, boxing, and fencing. Known as the “Way of the Intercepting Fist,” Jeet Kune Do is more a philosophy than a rigid set of techniques. The Jeet Kune Do Federation (JKDF) supports and promotes the art worldwide.
  18. Yaw-Yan: Yaw-Yan, or the “Dance of Death,” is a Filipino martial art that combines elements of Boxing, Muay Thai, Eskrima, and Judo. Founded by Napoleon Fernandez in the 1970s, Yaw-Yan emphasizes speed and power. Although not as widely known as other martial arts, Yaw-Yan has a dedicated following in the Philippines.
  19. Shorinji Kempo: Founded in 1947 by martial artist Doshin So, Shorinji Kempo is a Japanese martial art that combines self-defense, meditation, and spiritual development. Shorinji Kempo incorporates striking, grappling, and pressure point techniques. The World Shorinji Kempo Organization (WSKO) oversees the sport and holds events such as the World Shorinji Kempo Championships.
  20. Dambe: Dambe is a traditional African martial art and combat sport originating among the Hausa people of Nigeria, Niger, and Chad. It involves striking with fists and kicks, often practiced by Hausa butcher caste groups. Although not a widely known sport, Dambe has a dedicated following in West Africa.
  21. Canne de Combat: Canne de Combat, originating in France in the 19th century, is a martial art and combat sport utilizing a single stick for striking, parrying, and evasive movements. The International Canne de Combat Federation (FIC) governs the sport, holding events such as the Canne de Combat World Championships.
  22. Catch Wrestling: Catch Wrestling, originating in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in England, is a grappling-focused martial art combining elements of submission wrestling, freestyle wrestling, and judo. Popularized by circus and carnival wrestlers in the United States and the United Kingdom, Catch Wrestling has influenced modern grappling arts and mixed martial arts.
  23. Combat Hapkido: Combat Hapkido, founded by John Pellegrini in 1990, is a modern adaptation of the traditional Korean martial art Hapkido, focusing on practical self-defense techniques and ground fighting. The International Combat Hapkido Federation (ICHF) governs the sport and provides certification and training programs.
  24. Combat Sambo: Combat Sambo is a Russian martial art and combat sport that combines techniques from judo, wrestling, boxing, and other martial arts. Developed in the early 20th century by the Soviet Red Army, Combat Sambo focuses on self-defense and hand-to-hand combat. Major Combat Sambo events include the Combat Sambo World Championships.
  25. Glima: Glima is a traditional Scandinavian martial art and combat sport originating in the Viking Age. It is a form of wrestling that emphasizes balance, speed, and strength. While not a widely practiced sport today, Glima has gained some popularity in Scandinavian countries and among Viking reenactment groups.
  26. Kalaripayattu: Kalaripayattu is an ancient Indian martial art originating in the southern state of Kerala. It focuses on fluid movement, weaponry, and unarmed combat. Although primarily a traditional martial art, Kalaripayattu has started to gain international recognition and is often showcased in cultural events and performances.
  27. Kempo: Kempo, also known as Kenpo, is a Japanese martial art that combines techniques from various Chinese and Japanese martial arts styles. Kempo emphasizes striking, kicking, joint locks, throws, and grappling techniques. While Kempo is not a competitive sport in the traditional sense, it has gained a dedicated following worldwide.
  28. Khridoli: Khridoli is a traditional Georgian martial art that dates back to the 1920s. It includes striking, kicking, grappling, and weapon techniques. Although not as widespread as other martial arts, Khridoli has a dedicated following in Georgia and is taught in specialized schools.
  29. Kurash: Kurash is a traditional Central Asian martial art and combat sport similar to judo and Sambo, focusing on throws and grappling. The International Kurash Association (IKA) governs the sport and organizes events such as the World Kurash Championships.
  30. Laamb Wrestling: Laamb Wrestling is a traditional Senegalese martial art and combat sport that involves grappling and throws. It is deeply rooted in Senegalese culture and is often combined with rhythmic drumming and dancing. Laamb Wrestling has gained popularity beyond Senegal, with events now held internationally.
  31. Leelo: Leelo is an Estonian martial art and combat sport that includes elements of wrestling and kickboxing. Although not as widely known as other combat sports, Leelo is practiced in Estonia and neighboring countries, reflecting the unique blend of local cultural influences.
  32. Malla-yuddha: Malla-yuddha is an ancient Indian martial art involving grappling, striking, and submissions. Malla-yuddha dates back thousands of years and is mentioned in ancient scriptures like the Mahabharata and Ramayana. While Malla-yuddha is not a widely practiced sport today, it has historical significance and cultural importance in India.
  33. Greco-Roman Wrestling: A style of wrestling that originated in ancient Greece and Rome, Greco-Roman Wrestling forbids holds below the waist and the use of legs for offense or defense. It emphasizes upper body strength, throws, and grappling. Greco-Roman Wrestling has been part of the modern Olympic Games since 1896, and the United World Wrestling (UWW) oversees the sport. The UWW World Wrestling Championships include Greco-Roman events.
  34. Freestyle Wrestling: A popular modern wrestling style that allows the use of legs in offense and defense, Freestyle Wrestling involves a combination of throws, takedowns, and ground wrestling. Freestyle Wrestling became part of the Olympic Games in 1904 and is governed by the United World Wrestling (UWW). The UWW World Wrestling Championships and the NCAA Wrestling Championships showcase this exciting style of wrestling.
  35. Shuai Jiao: An ancient Chinese martial art focused on throws, Shuai Jiao emphasizes speed and technical skills in its grappling techniques. Though not as globally popular as other martial arts, Shuai Jiao has a presence in China and countries with significant Chinese cultural influence. Shuai Jiao showcases its techniques in competitions like the Beijing Shuai Jiao Tournament.
  36. Kendo: Kendo, a modern Japanese martial art, originates from traditional swordsmanship, focusing on sword fighting with protective gear and bamboo swords. Kendo practice emphasizes physical and mental discipline, honour, and respect. It is governed by the International Kendo Federation (IKF) and holds events such as the World Kendo Championships and European Kendo Championships.
  37. Silat: Originating in Southeast Asia, particularly Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines, Silat is a diverse martial art that includes striking, grappling, and the use of weapons. Silat emphasizes fluid, dance-like movements, making it unique among combat sports. The International Pencak Silat Federation (PERSILAT) governs this martial art, organizing events including the Pencak Silat World Championships.
  38. Systema: A Russian martial art with roots in the Soviet Union, Systema combines hand-to-hand combat, grappling, and the use of weapons. Developed by the Russian military, Systema emphasizes fluid movement, relaxation, and improvised techniques. While not as widespread as some martial arts, Systema is practiced in Russia and several other countries.
  39. Pradal Serey: Also known as Kun Khmer, Pradal Serey is a Cambodian martial art similar to Muay Thai, emphasizing strikes using punches, kicks, elbows, and knees. Pradal Serey emerged over a thousand years ago and focuses on fluid, continuous attacks. The sport is popular in Cambodia, and fighters compete in events such as the Southeast Asian Games.
  40. Bokator: Another Cambodian martial art, Bokator is characterized by its wide range of techniques, including strikes, grappling, and weapons training. With a rich history dating back thousands of years, this martial art emphasizes discipline, flexibility, and power. Today, Bokator is practiced primarily in Cambodia, where it is considered a cultural heritage.
  41. San Shou: A Chinese martial art that emphasizes striking and throws, San Shou developed as a modern sport in China during the 20th century. Also known as Sanda or Chinese kickboxing, San Shou is popular in China and is practiced worldwide. Major San Shou events include the World Wushu Championships and national championships in various countries.
  42. Taido: A Japanese martial art founded in the 1960s by Seiken Shukumine, Taido emphasizes acrobatic movements, unconventional techniques, and adaptability in combat. Taido combines elements of karate and gymnastics, promoting flexibility, balance, and mental focus. Though Taido is not as well-known as other martial arts, it is practiced primarily in Japan and has a dedicated following.
  43. Wushu: Wushu, also known as Chinese Kung Fu, is a contemporary martial art that incorporates elements of traditional Chinese martial arts styles, including striking, grappling, and weapons training. The International Wushu Federation (IWUF) governs the sport, with the World Wushu Championships and the Asian Wushu Championships being major events in the Wushu world.
  44. Wing Chun: A Chinese martial art with origins in the 18th century, Wing Chun emphasizes close-range combat, efficient movements, and a balance of offense and defense. Made famous by practitioners such as Ip Man and Bruce Lee, Wing Chun emphasizes quick, powerful strikes and efficient energy use. The sport is practiced worldwide, particularly in China and Hong Kong.
  45. Jeet Kune Do: Founded by martial arts legend Bruce Lee in the 1960s, Jeet Kune Do is a hybrid martial art based on Lee’s personal philosophy and techniques from various combat disciplines. Jeet Kune Do emphasizes fluidity, adaptability, and directness in its striking and grappling techniques. Practiced globally, the sport continues to draw fans of Bruce Lee and his teachings.
  46. Yaw-Yan: Developed in the Philippines in the 1970s, Yaw-Yan, or Dance of Death, is a Filipino martial art that combines elements of kickboxing, grappling, and weapons training. Yaw-Yan focuses on fast, powerful strikes using kicks and punches. Though not as widely known as some martial arts, Yaw-Yan has a dedicated following in the Philippines and a growing presence internationally.
  47. Shorinji Kempo: Founded in Japan in the 1940s by Doshin So, Shorinji Kempo is a martial art that combines elements of Shaolin Kung Fu, Japanese martial arts, and Zen Buddhism. The sport aims to promote physical and mental well-being, emphasizing self-defense techniques, grappling, and strikes. Practiced primarily in Japan, Shorinji Kempo has followers in several countries.
  48. Dambe: A traditional African martial art originating among the Hausa people of Nigeria, Dambe is a brutal boxing-style sport that utilizes punches, kicks, and grappling. Historically practiced by traveling warrior clans, Dambe has grown in popularity across Nigeria and West Africa. Although not a mainstream combat sport, Dambe maintains a strong cultural presence in its region.
  49. Canne de Combat: A French martial art developed in the early 19th century, Canne de Combat involves the use of a cane as a weapon for striking, thrusting, and defense. This martial art emphasizes speed, fluidity, and technical skills. Governed by the International Canne de Combat Federation (FIC), Canne de Combat competitions take place across Europe.
  50. Catch Wrestling: Developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Britain and the United States, Catch Wrestling is a grappling-based combat sport that emphasizes submission holds, pinning, and ground wrestling. Catch Wrestling has influenced modern combat sports such as professional wrestling and MMA, with practitioners worldwide.
  51. Combat Hapkido: Founded in the 1990s by John Pellegrini, Combat Hapkido is a modern variation of traditional Hapkido, emphasizing practical self-defense techniques, joint locks, and throws. With a focus on real-world applications, Combat Hapkido is practiced globally for its self-defense effectiveness.
  52. Combat Sambo: Combat Sambo is a Russian martial art and combat sport, originated in the early 1920s by the Soviet Red Army to improve their hand-to-hand combat abilities. It is a hybrid of Judo and various traditional wrestling styles. The sport is governed by the International Sambo Federation (FIAS). Major events include the FIAS World Sambo Championships. Combat Sambo is not an Olympic sport.
  53. Glima: Glima is a traditional form of wrestling originating from the Viking age in Scandinavia, and it remains popular in Nordic countries today. The sport is governed by the Nordic Glima Federation. Major competitions include the Nordic Championships in Glima. It is not an Olympic sport.
  54. Kalaripayattu: Kalaripayattu is an ancient martial art that originated in the South Indian state of Kerala, believed to be one of the oldest fighting systems in existence. The sport is governed locally by various Kalaripayattu federations in India. It is not recognized in the Olympic Games.
  55. Kempo: Kempo, also known as Kenpo, is a form of martial arts with roots in Japan, China, and Hawaii. The International Kempo Federation (IKF) oversees the sport. Major events include the IKF World Championships. Kempo is not an Olympic sport.
  56. Khridoli: Khridoli is a traditional Georgian martial art that incorporates wrestling, judo, and boxing. The sport is recognized by the Georgian National Federation of Traditional Martial Arts. Khridoli is not an Olympic sport.
  57. Kurash: Kurash is a traditional form of wrestling from Uzbekistan. The sport is governed by the International Kurash Association and major tournaments include the World Kurash Championships. Kurash was a demonstration sport at the 2018 Asian Games.
  58. Laamb Wrestling: Laamb wrestling is a traditional form of wrestling from Senegal, known for its rich cultural rituals as much as for the sport itself. The National Wrestling Federation of Senegal governs the sport. It is not part of the Olympic Games.
  59. Leelo: Leelo is an ancient Estonian team sport that combines elements of tag and ball games. The sport is governed by the Leelo League of Estonia. Major tournaments are mostly local Estonian championships. Leelo is not an Olympic sport.
  60. Malla-yuddha: Malla-yuddha is an ancient form of combat wrestling from South Asia, primarily India, practiced as far back as the 5th millennium BC. The sport is governed by various local bodies. Malla-yuddha is not recognized in the Olympic Games.
  61. Naban: Naban is a traditional style of wrestling from Myanmar. The Myanmar Traditional Naban Federation oversees the sport. Major competitions include the Myanmar National Naban Championships. Naban is not an Olympic sport.
  62. Pehlwani: Pehlwani, or Kushti, is a form of wrestling from the Indian subcontinent. It is governed by the Wrestling Federation of India (WFI). Major events include the Hind Kesari and Rustam-e-Hind tournaments. Pehlwani is not an Olympic sport.
  63. Schwingen: Schwingen is a style of folk wrestling native to Switzerland. The sport is governed by the Federal Swiss Wrestling Festival. Major tournaments include the EidgenΓΆssisches Schwingfest. Schwingen is not an Olympic sport.
  64. Senegalese Wrestling: Senegalese wrestling, known as Laamb, is a highly popular sport in Senegal and parts of The Gambia. The sport is governed by the National Wrestling Federation of Senegal. It is not part of the Olympic Games.
  65. Tinku: Tinku is a traditional form of ritualistic combat from the Bolivian Andes. While more of a cultural practice than a sport, it is supervised locally by indigenous leaders. Tinku is not an Olympic sport.
  66. Varzesh-e Pahlavani: Varzesh-e Pahlavani, also known as Pahlavani Wrestling, is an ancient Iranian martial art that combines elements of wrestling and gymnastics. The sport is overseen by the International Zurkhaneh Sports Federation. Varzesh-e Pahlavani is not an Olympic sport.
  67. Vovinam: Vovinam is a Vietnamese martial art that was created in the mid-20th century, incorporating elements from traditional Vietnamese martial arts along with influences from Chinese, Khmer, and French techniques. The sport is governed by the World Vovinam Federation (WVVF). Major events include the World Vovinam Championships. Vovinam is not an Olympic sport.

FAQ

What are the most popular combat sports?

The most popular combat sports include boxing, mixed martial arts (MMA), Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ), Muay Thai, wrestling, judo, kickboxing, taekwondo, karate, and sambo.

How many different combat sports are there?

Our combat sports list includes 77 unique combat sports.

I'm a sports enthusiast who loves all kinds of ball and water sports. I run stand-up-paddling.org (#1 German Paddleboarding Blog), played competitive Badminton, took part in the German Mini Golf Championships, started learning 'real' Golf and dabbled in dozens of other sports & activities.

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