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Greetings, ball sport fanatics!

Are you prepared to be blown away?

Kick-off your journey through our ball sport list, sorted by popularity.

From professional athletes to casual weekend warriors, there’s a game for everyone to enjoy!

Ball Sports List

  1. Soccer (Football)
  2. Basketball
  3. Cricket
  4. Tennis
  5. Volleyball
  6. Table Tennis (Ping Pong)
  7. Baseball
  8. Rugby
  9. American Football
  10. Golf

#1 Soccer (Football)

Soccer

Soccer, known as football outside of North America, has its origins dating back over 2,000 years to various ancient cultures but the modern rules were first established in England in 1863.

It is now the most popular sport globally, particularly in Europe, South America, Africa, and Asia. Major tournaments include FIFA World Cup, UEFA Champions League, and the English Premier League. Soccer has been part of the Olympic program since the 1900 Paris Games.

#2 Basketball

Basketball

Basketball was invented in 1891 by Canadian James Naismith in Springfield, Massachusetts, USA. It quickly gained popularity and is now a beloved sport in North America, Europe, and China.

The National Basketball Association (NBA) in the USA and the EuroLeague in Europe are top professional leagues. Basketball has been an Olympic sport since the 1936 Berlin Games.

#3 Cricket

Cricket

Cricket has its origins in southeast England in the 16th century, and it is now widely popular in countries such as India, Australia, England, and the West Indies.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) oversees major tournaments, including the Cricket World Cup, the T20 World Cup, and the Ashes series between England and Australia. Cricket became an Olympic sport only once, in the 1900 Paris Games.

#4 Tennis

Tennis

Tennis is believed to have originated in France in the 12th century, and it has since evolved into the modern game we know today.

It is popular worldwide, with major tournaments such as Wimbledon, the US Open, the Australian Open, and the French Open.

Tennis has been part of the Olympic program since the 1896 Athens Games, excluding two separate periods of absence (1924-1984 and 1968-1984).

#5 Volleyball

Volleyball

Volleyball was invented in 1895 by American William G. Morgan as a recreational sport. The game has grown in popularity and is now played worldwide, particularly in North America, Brazil, and Europe.

The Fédération Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB) organizes major events such as the World Championships and the World Cup. Volleyball has been part of the Olympic program since the 1964 Tokyo Games.

#6 Table Tennis (Ping Pong)

Table Tennis

Table tennis, or ping pong, is believed to have originated in Victorian England as a parlor game. The sport gained popularity over time and is now played worldwide, particularly in China, South Korea, Japan, and Europe.

The International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) oversees the World Championships and the World Cup. Table tennis has been part of the Olympic program since the 1988 Seoul Games.

#7 Baseball

Baseball

Baseball has its origins in various bat-and-ball games played in England, but the modern version of the sport developed in the United States during the 18th and 19th centuries.

It is popular in North America, Central and South America, and East Asia. Major League Baseball (MLB) in the USA is the premier professional league. Baseball was part of the Olympic program from 1992 to 2008 and has been reintroduced in the 2020 Tokyo Games.

#8 Rugby

Rugby

Rugby has its origins in the early 19th century at Rugby School in England. It has two main forms: Rugby Union and Rugby League. The sport is popular in countries such as England, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, and France.

Major tournaments include the Rugby World Cup (Union) and the Rugby League World Cup.

Rugby Union was played in the Olympics between 1900 and 1924, and Rugby Sevens, a variant of Rugby Union, made its Olympic debut in the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games.

#9 American Football

American Football

American football, often simply called football in the USA, evolved from the combination of soccer and rugby in the late 19th century.

The sport is primarily popular in the United States, where the National Football League (NFL) is the premier professional league.

The NFL’s annual championship game, the Super Bowl, is one of the most-watched sporting events globally. American football is not part of the Olympic program.

#10 Golf

Golf

Golf has its origins in 15th-century Scotland, and it has since developed into the modern sport we know today. The game is popular worldwide, particularly in North America, Europe, and Asia.

Major tournaments include the Masters, the US Open, the British Open, and the PGA Championship.

Golf has been part of the Olympic program at the 1900 Paris Games, the 1904 St. Louis Games, and then reintroduced after a long absence at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games.

More Ball Sports

  1. Handball: Originating in Northern Europe around the 19th century, handball is particularly popular in countries such as Germany, Denmark, Spain, and France. Major tournaments include the World Handball Championships and the EHF Champions League. Handball has been an Olympic sport since the 1936 Berlin Games.
  2. Badminton: Badminton has its roots in ancient games played in India and China, but the modern version was developed in England in the 19th century. It is popular in countries such as China, India, Indonesia, and Denmark. The Badminton World Federation (BWF) oversees major events, including the World Championships and the All England Open. Badminton has been an Olympic sport since the 1992 Barcelona Games.
  3. Bowling: Bowling dates back to ancient civilizations, with evidence found in Egypt and ancient Rome. Modern ten-pin bowling is popular worldwide, especially in the United States, Europe, and East Asia. The World Bowling organization governs the sport and organizes the World Bowling Championships. Bowling is not part of the Olympic program.
  4. Squash: Squash was invented in England in the early 19th century. It is popular in countries such as England, Egypt, and Australia. The World Squash Federation (WSF) organizes the World Squash Championships. Squash is not an Olympic sport, though it has been considered for inclusion several times.
  5. Billiards: Billiards has its origins in games played on a lawn in 15th-century Northern Europe. It has since evolved into various forms, such as pool and snooker. Billiards is played worldwide, with top professional players hailing from countries such as the Philippines, the United States, the United Kingdom, and China. Billiards is not part of the Olympic program.
  6. Beach Volleyball: Beach volleyball was created in the United States during the 1920s and has since gained popularity worldwide, particularly in countries with beach culture such as Brazil, the United States, and Australia. The Fédération Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB) organizes the Beach Volleyball World Championships. Beach volleyball has been an Olympic sport since the 1996 Atlanta Games.
  7. Australian Rules Football: Australian Rules Football, also known as Aussie Rules or AFL, originated in Australia in the mid-19th century. The sport is most popular in Australia, where the Australian Football League (AFL) is the premier professional competition. Australian Rules Football is not part of the Olympic program.
  8. Gaelic Football: Gaelic football has its origins in traditional Irish sports and was formalized in the late 19th century. The sport is most popular in Ireland, where the All-Ireland Championship is the premier competition. Gaelic football is not part of the Olympic program.
  9. Softball: Softball was invented in the United States in the late 19th century as an indoor alternative to baseball. It is popular in the United States, Japan, Canada, and Australia. The World Baseball Softball Confederation (WBSC) organizes the Softball World Championship. Softball was part of the Olympic program from 1996 to 2008 and has been reintroduced in the 2020 Tokyo Games.
  10. Netball: Netball evolved from early versions of basketball in the late 19th century and was formalized in England in the early 20th century. The sport is most popular in countries such as England, Australia, and New Zealand. The International Netball Federation (INF) oversees the Netball World Cup. Netball is not part of the Olympic program.
  11. Lacrosse: Lacrosse has its origins in indigenous North American sports, dating back to the 17th century. The sport is most popular in the United States, Canada, and Australia. The Federation of International Lacrosse (FIL) organizes the World Lacrosse Championship. Lacrosse is not part of the Olympic program.
  12. Bocce Ball: Bocce ball is an ancient sport that dates back to the Roman Empire and is most popular in Italy and other European countries. The sport is governed by the International Bocce Federation (FIB), which organizes the Bocce World Championships. Bocce ball is not part of the Olympic program.
  13. Polo: Polo, a sport played on horseback, originated in Persia around the 6th century BC. The sport is most popular in Argentina, the United States, and the United Kingdom. The Federation of International Polo (FIP) organizes the Polo World Cup. Polo was an Olympic sport from 1900 to 1936, but it has not been included since.
  14. Sepak Takraw: Sepak takraw, sometimes called kick volleyball, originated in Southeast Asia over 500 years ago. The sport is most popular in countries such as Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. The International Sepak Takraw Federation (ISTAF) organizes the Sepak Takraw World Championships. Sepak takraw is not part of the Olympic program.
  15. Field Hockey: Field hockey has its origins in ancient civilizations and was further developed in England during the 19th century. The sport is most popular in countries such as India, Pakistan, the Netherlands, and Australia. The International Hockey Federation (FIH) organizes the Hockey World Cup and the Hockey Champions Trophy. Field hockey has been an Olympic sport since the 1908 London Games, excluding a one-time absence in 1924.
  16. Futsal: Futsal is a variation of soccer that originated in Uruguay in the 1930s and is played indoors with five players per team. It is popular in countries such as Brazil, Spain, and Iran. The Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) organizes the Futsal World Cup. Futsal is not part of the Olympic program.
  17. Hurling: Hurling is an ancient Gaelic sport with origins in Ireland over 3,000 years ago. The sport is most popular in Ireland, where the All-Ireland Championship is the premier competition. Hurling is not part of the Olympic program.
  18. Kabaddi: Kabaddi originated in ancient India and is a contact team sport that combines elements of wrestling and tag. It is popular in India, Iran, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. The International Kabaddi Federation (IKF) organizes the Kabaddi World Cup. Kabaddi is not part of the Olympic program.
  19. Floorball: Floorball is a type of indoor hockey developed in the 1970s in Sweden. The sport is popular in countries such as Sweden, Finland, and Switzerland. The International Floorball Federation (IFF) organizes the Floorball World Championships. Floorball is not part of the Olympic program.
  20. Pickleball: Pickleball was invented in the United States in the 1960s as a combination of elements from badminton, table tennis, and tennis. The sport is most popular in the United States and Canada. The International Pickleball Federation (IPF) organizes the Pickleball World Championships. Pickleball is not part of the Olympic program.
  21. Bandy: Bandy is a form of outdoor ice hockey that originated in England in the 19th century. The sport is most popular in countries such as Russia, Sweden, and Finland. The Federation of International Bandy (FIB) organizes the Bandy World Championship. Bandy is not part of the Olympic program.
  22. Petanque: Petanque is a form of boules that originated in France in the early 20th century. The sport is most popular in France and other European countries. The International Petanque Federation (FIPJP) organizes the Petanque World Championships. Petanque is not part of the Olympic program.
  23. Fistball: Fistball is a sport similar to volleyball that originated in Italy in the 16th century. The sport is most popular in countries such as Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. The International Fistball Association (IFA) organizes the Fistball World Championships. Fistball is not part of the Olympic program.
  24. Canoe Polo: Canoe polo, also known as kayak polo, combines elements of water polo, basketball, and canoeing and was developed in the 20th century. The sport is most popular in countries such as the United Kingdom, Germany, and Italy. The International Canoe Federation (ICF) organizes the Canoe Polo World Championships. Canoe polo is not part of the Olympic program.
  25. Bossaball: Bossaball is a sport that combines elements of volleyball, soccer, gymnastics, and capoeira on an inflatable court with trampolines. The sport was created in Spain in the early 21st century and is most popular in European and South American countries. Bossaball is not part of the Olympic program.
  26. Quidditch: Quidditch, inspired by the fictional sport in the Harry Potter series, is a mixed-gender full-contact sport that was created in the United States in 2005. The sport is played worldwide, with the International Quidditch Association (IQA) organizing the Quidditch World Cup. Quidditch is not part of the Olympic program.
  27. Raffa: Raffa is a form of boules that originated in Italy and is most popular in European countries. The International Boules and Petanque Federation (FIBP) organizes the Raffa World Championships. Raffa is not part of the Olympic program.
  28. Sipa: Sipa, also known as Sepak Raga, is a traditional Southeast Asian sport similar to sepak takraw. The sport is most popular in countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Sipa is not part of the Olympic program.
  29. Underwater Rugby: Underwater rugby is a contact sport that originated in Germany in the 1960s, combining elements of rugby and water polo. The sport is most popular in European countries, such as Germany, Norway, and Sweden. The World Underwater Federation (CMAS) organizes the Underwater Rugby World Championships. Underwater rugby is not part of the Olympic program.
  30. Pesäpallo: Pesäpallo, also known as Finnish baseball, was created in Finland in the 1920s. The sport is most popular in Finland, where the Superpesis league is the premier competition. Pesäpallo is not part of the Olympic program.
  31. Angleball: Angleball is a target sport that originated in the United States in the 1950s. The sport involves two teams trying to knock down their opponents’ target with a ball. Angleball is not part of the Olympic program.
  32. Apalachee ball game: The Apalachee ball game is a traditional Native American sport played by the Apalachee people of the southeastern United States. The game resembles soccer and lacrosse and is primarily of historical and cultural significance. The Apalachee ball game is not part of the Olympic program.
  33. Crossminton: Crossminton, also known as speed badminton, is a combination of badminton, tennis, and squash that was created in Germany in the 1990s. The sport is most popular in Germany and other European countries. The International Crossminton Organisation (ICO) organizes the Crossminton World Championships. Crossminton is not part of the Olympic program.
  34. Baseball5: Baseball5 is a fast-paced variation of baseball that was created by the World Baseball Softball Confederation (WBSC) in 2018. The sport is played with five players per team and does not require any specialized equipment. Baseball5 is not part of the Olympic program.
  35. 3×3 (Basketball): 3×3 basketball is a fast-paced variation of basketball that originated in the United States. The sport is played with three players per team on a half-court. The International Basketball Federation (FIBA) organizes the 3×3 World Cup. 3×3 basketball made its Olympic debut in the 2020 Tokyo Games.
  36. Wheelchair Basketball: Wheelball, as it is often called, emerged during rehabilitation programs for World War II veterans in the United States. Today, it’s played globally, with the International Wheelchair Basketball Federation (IWBF) governing the sport. Major tournaments include the IWBF World Championships and the Paralympic Games, where it has been a staple since the inaugural Games in 1960.
  37. Basque Pelota: Basque pelota is a court game originally from the Basque Country in Spain and France, tracing back to the 13th century. The sport is popular in Spanish and French speaking countries, with the International Federation of Basque Pelota (FIPV) governing it. Key tournaments include the World Championships of Basque Pelota. It was an Olympic sport only in the 1900 Summer Olympics.
  38. Beach Tennis: This sport combines elements of tennis and volleyball and was developed in Italy during the 1970s. It’s popular in coastal countries and territories, particularly in Italy, Brazil, and Spain. The International Tennis Federation (ITF) governs the sport, with major tournaments like the Beach Tennis World Championships. It is not an Olympic sport.
  39. Boules: Boules, which includes variations such as Pétanque, is a collective name for games where the objective is to throw or roll heavy balls as close as possible to a small target ball. Originating in ancient Rome, Boules is particularly popular in France. The Fédération Internationale de Pétanque et Jeu Provençal (FIPJP) governs the sport, and its key tournament is the Pétanque World Championships.
  40. Boccia: Boccia is a Paralympic sport, similar to boules, for athletes with physical disabilities. It originated in ancient Greece and is popular worldwide. The Boccia International Sports Federation governs the sport, with major tournaments like the Boccia World Championships and the Paralympic Games.
  41. Bowls: Also known as lawn bowls, the sport originates from the 13th century England. It is popular in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and South Africa. The World Bowls is the sport’s governing body and organizes the World Championships. The sport is not currently included in the Olympic Games.
  42. Jeu Provençal: Also known as Boule Lyonnaise, Jeu Provençal is a precursor to Pétanque, originating from Southern France. The Fédération Internationale de Pétanque et Jeu Provençal (FIPJP) governs the sport. The main tournament is the Championnat de France.
  43. Irish Road Bowling: This sport is an ancient Irish game where players throw a metal ball along a predetermined course of country roads. The sport is governed in Ireland by Bol Chumann na hEireann. The All-Ireland Championships are the major tournament in the sport.
  44. Brännboll: Brännboll is a bat-and-ball game originating from Sweden, often compared to American baseball. Today it’s popular in Nordic countries. The sport doesn’t have an international federation, but the Brännboll Cup is a major tournament.
  45. British Baseball: Developed in Wales in the 18th century, British baseball shares its roots with American baseball, yet it has distinctive rules. The sport is most popular in Wales and England. The Welsh Baseball Union and the English Baseball Association govern the sport. The main tournaments are the Welsh and English Baseball Championships.
  46. Broomball: Broomball has its roots in Canada and is a winter sport similar to ice hockey. Players use a broom to move a ball around an ice rink, aiming to score goals. The sport is popular in Canada, the USA, and Australia. The International Federation of Broomball Associations (IFBA) governs the sport. The main competition is the IFBA Broomball World Championships.
  47. Cestoball: Cestoball is an Argentine sport that combines elements of basketball and netball. It’s predominantly played in Argentina, and the Argentine Cestoball Confederation oversees the sport. The main tournament is the Argentine Cestoball Championship.
  48. Codeball: Codeball is a relatively modern sport that originated in the United States. The game is played on a rectangular court with two teams attempting to score by getting the ball into the opposing team’s goal. There is currently no international federation for the sport and no major tournaments.
  49. Vigoro: Vigoro is a sport that blends elements of cricket and baseball and was developed in Australia in the early 20th century. It’s predominantly played in Australia, and the Australian Vigoro Association governs the sport. The main tournament is the National Vigoro Titles.
  50. Croquet: Croquet is an outdoor sport, originated in England in the 19th century. The sport is played globally, with the World Croquet Federation (WCF) governing it. Major tournaments include the WCF World Championships. Croquet was an Olympic sport only in the 1900 Summer Olympics.
  51. Roque: Roque is an American variant of croquet and has been referred to as ‘American croquet’. It was included in the 1904 Summer Olympics, but the sport has dwindled in popularity since. There is currently no active international federation or major tournaments for roque.
  52. Cycle Ball: Cycle Ball, also known as Radball in German, is a sport similar to association football but played on bicycles. It originated in Germany in the late 19th century. The Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) governs the sport, with the UCI Indoor Cycling World Championships being a major competition.
  53. Downball: Downball is a popular schoolyard game from Australia, involving the use of a tennis ball and a flat wall. The game is similar to American handball and British Fives. There is currently no formal governing body or major tournaments.
  54. Fives: Fives is an English sport that involves hitting a ball against a wall using gloves or bare hands. The sport is predominantly played in the United Kingdom. The Fives Federation oversees the sport, with major tournaments including the British Universities & Colleges Sport Championships.
  55. Flag Football: Flag football is a modified version of American football where the defensive team must remove a flag from the ball carrier to end a down rather than tackling them. The sport is popular worldwide, and the International Federation of American Football (IFAF) governs the sport. The IFAF Flag Football World Championship is a major tournament.
  56. Flickerball: Flickerball is a sport often played in the United States Air Force as a means of keeping troops physically fit. It involves elements of American football and basketball. There is currently no formal governing body or major tournaments for flickerball.
  57. Football Tennis: Football Tennis, also known as futnet, is a hybrid sport that mixes elements of football and tennis. Originating in the Czech Republic in the 1920s, the sport is governed by the International Footballtennis Association (FIFTA). Major tournaments include the FIFTA World Championship.
  58. Four Square: Four Square is a popular ball game played on a square court, primarily in school settings. Originating in the United States, it’s played worldwide but lacks a formal international governing body. There are, however, national tournaments like the Four Square World Championships in the US.
  59. Goalball: Goalball is a team sport designed for athletes with visual impairments. Players use a ball with bells inside and aim to throw it into the opponents’ goal. The International Blind Sports Federation (IBSA) governs the sport. Major tournaments include the IBSA Goalball World Championships and the Paralympic Games.
  60. Half-Rubber: Half-Rubber is a bat-and-ball game, primarily played in the Southern United States. There are no international federations or major tournaments, but there are regional championships like the Half Rubber National Championships in South Carolina.
  61. Hooverball: Hooverball is a sport invented during the presidency of Herbert Hoover to keep him fit. It’s a mix of volleyball and tennis, played with a medicine ball. The sport is played primarily in the United States, and the National Hooverball Championships serve as its major competition.
  62. Jokgu: Jokgu is a hybrid of football and volleyball that originated from South Korea’s military in the 1960s. The sport is governed by the Korea Jokgu Association. The major tournament is the National Jokgu Championships in South Korea.
  63. Jorkyball: Jorkyball is a 2-player sport that originated in France in the 1980s. The game is similar to soccer but is played on a small, enclosed court. The sport is governed by the International Jorkyball Federation, with the World Jorkyball Championship serving as a major tournament.
  64. Juggling: Juggling as a sport involves the manipulation of objects—usually via tossing and catching—for recreation, entertainment, or competition. The International Jugglers’ Association organizes the World Juggling Federation Championship, which is the main competitive event in this field.
  65. Kickball: Kickball is a sport similar to baseball, where players kick a rubber ball instead of using a bat to hit it. Originally from the United States, the sport is governed by the World Adult Kickball Association. The major tournament is the Kickball World Championship.
  66. Kick-to-kick: Kick-to-kick is an informal and social Australian rules football activity in which participants kick a football to each other. It’s often played in public spaces and lacks a formal international governing body or major tournaments.
  67. Kin-Ball: Kin-Ball is a team sport created in Canada that involves three teams and a large ball. The International Kin-Ball Federation oversees the sport. Major tournaments include the IKBF World Championships.
  68. Klootschieten: Klootschieten is a sport from the Netherlands in which participants throw a ball (kloot) as far as they can. The sport is primarily popular in the Netherlands and Germany. The International Klootschiet Federation organizes events such as the European Championships.
  69. Knuckleball: The term “knuckleball” typically refers to a type of pitch in baseball, thrown with minimal spin, which results in an unpredictable trajectory. It’s not a separate sport but a skill within baseball. The sport of baseball is governed internationally by the World Baseball Softball Confederation (WBSC).
  70. Lawn Bowls: Also simply known as bowls, this sport originated in 13th century England. The World Bowls governs the sport, with the World Championships being the major event.
  71. Mesoamerican Ballgame: The Mesoamerican Ballgame is an ancient sport played by pre-Columbian cultures in Mesoamerica. The modern revival of the game, ulama, is played in a few communities in Mexico. There are no major international tournaments or governing bodies.
  72. Newcomb Ball: Newcomb ball (also known as Newcombe ball) is a ball game played as a formal sport in few locations but more often as a playground game. It was invented in 1895 by Clara Baer, a physical education instructor at Newcomb College, Tulane University in New Orleans. There are no major international governing bodies or tournaments.
  73. Padbol: Padbol is a hybrid sport combining elements of football and padel tennis, which originated in Argentina in the early 21st century. The sport is governed by the International Padbol Federation. The Padbol World Cup is the sport’s major tournament.
  74. Paintball: Paintball is a competitive shooting sport that originated in the United States in the 1980s. The sport is played worldwide and is governed by various organizations, with major tournaments like the Paintball World Cup. It is not an Olympic sport.
  75. Palin: Palin is a traditional game of the Mapuche people of Chile, similar to hockey. It’s traditionally played during social gatherings and events. There are no known major international governing bodies or tournaments.
  76. Pelota Mixteca: Pelota Mixteca is a team sport similar to a net-less tennis, originally played by the indigenous peoples of Mexico. No major international governing body exists, but it is a culturally significant sport in regions of Mexico.
  77. Picigin: Picigin is a traditional water sport from Croatia. The game involves players keeping a small ball from touching the water. The World Picigin Federation governs the sport, and the major tournament is the World Picigin Championship.
  78. Pushball: Pushball is a team sport that originated in the United States in the late 19th century. The game involves pushing a large ball toward the opponents’ goal line. The sport lacks a formal international governing body or major tournaments.
  79. Racquetball: Racquetball is a racquet sport that originated in the United States in the 1950s. The sport is governed by the International Racquetball Federation (IRF), with the IRF World Championships being the major event.
  80. Ringball: Ringball is a traditional South African team sport that resembles netball. It’s governed by the South African Ringball Association, and the major tournament is the National Championships in South Africa.
  81. Rock-It-Ball: Rock-It-Ball is a sport that was created in the United Kingdom. It involves players trying to strike opponents with small foam balls. There is no official governing body or major tournaments for the sport.
  82. Skee Ball: Skee ball is a common arcade game where players roll balls up a ramp to score points in designated holes. While not a conventional sport, tournaments do exist, such as the Brewskee-Ball National Championships in the United States.
  83. Slamball: Slamball is a form of basketball played with trampolines, created in the United States. The sport lacks a global governing body, but it has professional leagues in various countries.
  84. Stickball: Stickball is a street game related to baseball, and it often involves a broom handle and a rubber ball. The sport is primarily played in urban areas in the United States. There are no international governing bodies or major tournaments.
  85. Streetball: Streetball is a variant of basketball, typically played on outdoor courts and featuring significantly less formal structure and enforcement of the game’s rules. While there is no formal global governing body, tournaments like the Street Basketball Association Championship exist.
  86. Teqball: Teqball is a football-based sport that originated in Hungary in the 21st century, where a ball is passed across a curved table tennis-like table. The International Federation of Teqball (FITEQ) governs the sport, with the Teqball World Championships serving as a major tournament.
  87. Ulama: Ulama is a revival of the ancient Mesoamerican ballgame, played in a few communities in Mexico. It involves heavy rubber balls and hip-checking. There is no formal international governing body or major tournaments.
  88. Valencian Pilota: Valencian Pilota is a traditional handball sport played in the Valencian Community of Spain. The sport is governed by the International Ball game Confederation. The main event is the Handball World Championship.
  89. Water Basketball: Water basketball is a water sport which mixes the rules of basketball and water polo, played in a swimming pool. Teams attempt to score by throwing the ball into a goal. The sport lacks a formal international governing body or major tournaments.
  90. Welsh Handball: Welsh handball is similar to fives, a sport popular in England. The game is nearly extinct but was traditionally played in Wales. There are no major tournaments or international governing bodies for the sport.
  91. Wiffleball: Wiffleball is a variation of the sport of baseball designed for indoor or outdoor play in confined areas, using a lightweight, perforated, plastic ball and a long, plastic (typically yellow) bat. The sport is popular in the United States and has no formal international governing body, but there is the World Wiffle Ball Championship.
  92. Wireball: Wireball is a street sport that originated in Philadelphia, United States. It involves a ball and a wire mesh fence. The sport lacks a formal international governing body and major tournaments.

FAQ

What are the most popular ball sports?

The most popular ball sports include soccer (football), basketball, cricket, tennis, volleyball, table tennis (ping pong), baseball, rugby, American football, and golf.

How many different ball sports are there?

Our ball sports list includes 102 unique ball sports.

Max is a sports enthusiast who loves all kinds of ball and water sports. He founded & runs stand-up-paddling.org (#1 German Paddleboarding Blog), played competitive Badminton and Mini Golf (competed on national level in Germany), started learning ‘real’ Golf and dabbled in dozens of other sports & activities.

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