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Get ready, adrenaline junkies!

Are you prepared to push your limits and experience the thrill of your life?

Jump into our Red Bull Extreme Sports list, sorted by popularity.

From daring daredevils to courageous first-timers, this electrifying compilation has got you covered!

#1 Freestyle Motocross (FMX)

Freestyle Motocross

Freestyle Motocross (FMX) is a variation of motocross racing that focuses on performing daring tricks and jumps while airborne. The sport originated in the late 1990s and gained popularity through events like the X Games and Red Bull X-Fighters.

FMX has its roots in the United States, but it has since gained popularity all around the world. Some of the most renowned FMX athletes include Travis Pastrana, Nate Adams, and Levi Sherwood.

Although FMX is not an Olympic sport, it continues to be a crowd-pleasing spectacle in extreme sports events.

#2 Skateboarding

Skateboarding

Skateboarding traces its origins back to the 1950s in California, where surfers wanted an alternative activity when the waves were flat. It quickly gained popularity and evolved into a unique sport with its own culture and style.

Today, skateboarding is popular worldwide, with professional competitions such as Street League Skateboarding (SLS) and the X Games.

Skateboarding made its Olympic debut during the 2020 Tokyo Games, cementing its place as a global sport. Iconic skateboarders include Tony Hawk, Rodney Mullen, and Nyjah Huston.

#3 Snowboarding

Snowboarding

Snowboarding was born in the 1960s in the United States as an alternative to skiing, inspired by skateboarding and surfing. It gained popularity in the 1980s and 1990s, with major competitions like the Winter X Games showcasing the sport.

Snowboarding has been part of the Winter Olympic program since the 1998 Nagano Games. Some of the most legendary snowboarders include Shaun White, Kelly Clark, and Hannah Teter.

Snowboarding is popular in countries with mountainous terrains and snowy winters, such as the United States, Canada, and Japan.

#4 Surfing

Surfing

Surfing has its origins in ancient Polynesian culture, particularly in Hawaii, where it was a central part of society. Today, surfing is popular in countries with coastlines offering good wave conditions, such as the USA, Australia, and Brazil.

The World Surf League (WSL) holds the annual Championship Tour, and surfing made its Olympic debut in the 2020 Tokyo Games. Iconic surfers like Kelly Slater, Stephanie Gilmore, and John John Florence have dominated the sport throughout the years.

#5 Downhill Mountain Biking

Downhill Mountain Biking

Downhill Mountain Biking, a thrilling off-road bicycle racing discipline, originated in the early 1970s in California as an adaptation of traditional road-based bike racing.

The sport is popular in countries with hilly and rugged landscapes, such as the United States, Canada, Australia, and various European countries. The Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) governs the sport, with the Mountain Bike World Cup and World Championships taking place annually.

Downhill Mountain Biking is not currently part of the Olympic program, but its close cousin, Cross-Country Mountain Biking, has been featured since the 1996 Atlanta Games.

#6 Parkour

Parkour

Parkour, also known as freerunning, was developed in France during the 1980s and 1990s by David Belle and SΓ©bastien Foucan. It is an urban sport that involves traversing urban environments and overcoming obstacles through running, jumping, and climbing.

Parkour has gained global popularity, with various competitions and events organized around the world, such as Red Bull Art of Motion and FIG Parkour World Cup.

Although Parkour is not an Olympic sport, its dynamic and exciting nature makes it a popular discipline for extreme sports enthusiasts.

#7 BMX Racing

BMX Racing

BMX (Bicycle Motocross) Racing emerged in the early 1970s in California as an off-road alternative to traditional road biking. BMX Racing is popular in the United States, Australia, and Europe, with the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) governing the sport.

BMX Racing became an Olympic sport during the 2008 Beijing Games. Some of the most famous BMX racers include Maris Strombergs, Caroline Buchanan, and Connor Fields.

#8 Skydiving

Skydiving

Skydiving traces its roots back to the late 18th century when early parachute designs were tested by French thrill-seekers. Modern skydiving gained popularity in the 20th century, particularly in the United States.

Today, skydiving is a popular extreme sport worldwide, with the International Skydiving Commission (ISC) overseeing various disciplines, including formation skydiving and freeflying.

World Championships and other international competitions take place regularly, though skydiving has not been included in the Olympic program.

#9 BASE Jumping

BASE Jumping

BASE Jumping is an extreme sport where participants leap from fixed objects (Building, Antenna, Span, and Earth) and deploy a parachute during the descent.

The sport traces its origins to the 1970s and 1980s, with icons like Carl Boenish pioneering the sport.

BASE Jumping is practiced worldwide, with famous locations such as Norway’s Kjerag and Malaysia’s Kuala Lumpur Tower drawing jumpers from around the globe.

Due to its high-risk nature, BASE Jumping is not an Olympic sport and faces restrictions in various locations.

#10 Wingsuit Flying

Wingsuit Flying

Wingsuit Flying involves skydivers or BASE jumpers wearing specialized suits that create lift, allowing them to glide through the air at high speeds.

The sport has its origins in the 1990s, with pioneers like Patrick de Gayardon and LoΓ―c Jean-Albert making significant advancements.

Wingsuit Flying is popular in locations with suitable high-altitude exit points, such as the Swiss Alps and the United States’ Moab desert. The sport is not part of the Olympic program and is considered one of the most extreme and high-risk sports in existence.

More Red Bull Extreme Sports

  1. Cliff Diving: Cliff diving has roots in ancient Hawaiian rituals and gained modern popularity in the 20th century. Divers jump from towering cliffs into the ocean, sometimes reaching heights of up to 85 feet. The Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series is an annual competition that showcases this thrilling sport. While cliff diving is not an Olympic event, it continues to mesmerize audiences worldwide.
  2. Wakeboarding: Originating in the 1980s, wakeboarding combines techniques from water-skiing, snowboarding, and surfing. The sport is popular in the USA, Australia, and Europe. The International Waterski & Wakeboard Federation (IWWF) oversees the sport, and the World Wakeboard Championships are held annually.
  3. Free Climbing: Free climbing is a form of rock climbing that relies only on the climber’s physical strength and skill, without the use of equipment for upward progress. The sport gained popularity in the 1970s and is now practiced worldwide in areas with suitable rock formations. Notable free climbers include Alex Honnold and Tommy Caldwell. Although not an Olympic sport, free climbing’s cousin, sport climbing, made its debut in the 2020 Tokyo Games.
  4. Drifting: Drifting is a motorsport that originated in Japan in the 1970s. Drivers intentionally oversteer their cars and maintain control while sliding around corners at high speeds. Drifting competitions, such as the Formula Drift Championship, are held worldwide. Though not an Olympic sport, drifting continues to be a popular automotive-based extreme sport.
  5. Kiteboarding: Kiteboarding, also known as kitesurfing, was developed in the late 20th century by pioneers like the Legaignoux brothers and Cory Roeseler. The sport involves riding on a board while being propelled by a large kite. It is popular in locations with consistent winds, such as the Dominican Republic, Tarifa, Spain, and Cape Town, South Africa. The Global Kitesports Association (GKA) oversees the sport, and the annual GKA Kite World Tour is held across multiple locations.
  6. Slacklining: Developed in the late 20th century, slacklining involves balancing on a narrow piece of webbing tensioned between two anchor points. This sport evolved from tightrope walking but features a more dynamic, bouncy line. Slacklining is practiced both recreationally and competitively worldwide, with popular events like the World Slackline Masters held annually. Slacklining is not part of the Olympic program.
  7. White Water Rafting: White Water Rafting is an exhilarating water sport where participants navigate a raft through rough waters, typically in whitewater river conditions. It is popular in regions with fast-flowing rivers, such as the Colorado River in the USA and the Zambezi River in Africa. White Water Rafting is not an Olympic sport but is a favorite among thrill-seekers worldwide.
  8. Rally Racing: Rally Racing is an off-road form of Motorsport that began in the early 20th century. Races, known as rallies, take place on various terrains such as gravel, sand, snow, and ice. Some of the most prestigious rally competitions include the FIA World Rally Championship and the Dakar Rally. Rally Racing is not part of the Olympic program but has a devoted following among motor racing enthusiasts.

FAQ

What are some of the most popular Red Bull Extreme Sports?

Some of the most popular Red Bull Extreme Sports include Freestyle Motocross (FMX), Skateboarding, Snowboarding, Surfing, Downhill Mountain Biking, Parkour, BMX Racing, Skydiving, BASE Jumping, and Wingsuit Flying.

How many different extreme sports are featured in the Red Bull Extreme Sports list?

Our Red Bull Extreme Sports list features 18 unique extreme sports.

I'm a sports enthusiast who loves all kinds of ball and water sports. I run stand-up-paddling.org (#1 German Paddleboarding Blog), played competitive Badminton, took part in the German Mini Golf Championships, started learning 'real' Golf and dabbled in dozens of other sports & activities.

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