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Hey there, sports aficionados!

Are you looking for some action-packed, team spirit-filled fun?

Discover our list of partner sports, sorted by popularity!

Whether you’re an experienced athlete or trying something new, these dynamic duos will certainly bring excitement and adventure into your life! So grab your partner, and let’s get ready to rumble!

Partner Sports List

  1. Beach Volleyball
  2. Tennis
  3. Badminton
  4. Table Tennis
  5. Squash
  6. Platform Tennis
  7. Padel Tennis
  8. Pickleball
  9. Mixed Martial Arts Tag Team
  10. Synchronized Swimming

#1 Beach Volleyball

Beach Volleyball

Beach Volleyball originated in Santa Monica, California, in the 1920s. The sport gained immense popularity in the United States and subsequently spread worldwide.

The first professional beach volleyball tournament, the Manhattan Beach Open, took place in 1960. Beach volleyball became an Olympic sport in the 1996 Atlanta Games.

The Federation Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB) governs the sport, organizing international events like the FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour and the FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships.

#2 Tennis

Tennis

Tennis has a long history, with its origins tracing back to 12th-century France. The modern game of tennis, however, was developed in late 19th-century England. Today, tennis is popular worldwide.

The International Tennis Federation (ITF) governs the sport, and four major tournaments, collectively known as the Grand Slams (Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon, and US Open), are held annually.

Tennis has been part of the Olympics since the 1896 Athens Games, except during the period from 1928 to 1984.

#3 Badminton

badminton

Badminton is believed to have its roots in ancient India and China, with a modern version of the game developing in the mid-19th century in British India.

Nowadays, badminton is popular in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. The Badminton World Federation (BWF) governs the sport and organizes prestigious events like the BWF World Championships and the BWF World Tour.

Badminton first appeared as a demonstration sport at the 1972 Munich Olympics and became an official Olympic sport in the 1992 Barcelona Games.

#4 Table Tennis

Table Tennis

Table tennis, also known as ping pong, originated in Victorian England during the late 19th century. The sport quickly gained popularity globally, particularly in Asia.

The International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) oversees the sport and organizes major events, such as the ITTF World Championships and the ITTF World Tour.

Table tennis became an Olympic sport in the 1988 Seoul Games, with singles and doubles events for both men and women.

#5 Squash

Squash

Squash was developed in the early 19th century at Harrow School in England. Today, the sport is popular in countries such as the United Kingdom, Egypt, and Australia.

The World Squash Federation (WSF) governs the sport, with the annual WSF World Championships being the premier event. Despite several bids, squash has not yet become an Olympic sport, but it is included in various multi-sport events such as the Commonwealth Games and the Asian Games.

#6 Platform Tennis

Platform Tennis

Platform tennis, also known as paddle tennis, was invented in 1928 in Scarsdale, New York, by Fessenden S. Blanchard and James K. Cogswell. The sport is predominantly popular in the United States, especially the Northeast and Midwest regions.

The American Platform Tennis Association (APTA) governs the sport and organizes the annual APTA National Championships. Platform tennis has not yet been included in the Olympics or other major multi-sport events.

#7 Padel Tennis

Padel Tennis

Padel tennis, or simply padel, was invented in 1969 by Enrique Corcuera in Mexico. In recent years, padel has become increasingly popular in Spain and other European countries.

The International Padel Federation (FIP) oversees the sport and organizes events such as the FIP World Championships. Padel is not part of the Olympic program, but it is included in certain multi-sport events like the World Padel Games.

#8 Pickleball

Pickleball

Pickleball was created in 1965 on Bainbridge Island, Washington, by Joel Pritchard, Bill Bell, and Barney McCallum. The sport has gained popularity in the United States, Canada, and several European countries.

The International Pickleball Teaching Professional Association (IPTPA) and the USA Pickleball Association (USAPA) are two of the main organizations responsible for the sport.

Pickleball has not been included in the Olympics, but several national and international tournaments take place annually.

#9 Mixed Martial Arts Tag Team

Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) Tag Team is a relatively new combat sport format, with matches featuring two-person teams. It combines various martial arts disciplines and fighting techniques.

MMA Tag Team events, such as the Quintet organization founded by Japanese MMA legend Kazushi Sakuraba, have gained popularity in recent years. MMA is not an Olympic sport, and the interest in tag team formats is still in the early stages of growth.

#10 Synchronized Swimming

Synchronized Swimming

Synchronized swimming, now officially known as artistic swimming, has its origins dating back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Canada and the United States.

The sport involves teams of swimmers performing choreographed routines in the water. The International Swimming Federation (FINA) governs the sport, and synchronized swimming has been part of the Olympics since the 1984 Los Angeles Games.

The FINA Artistic Swimming World Series is an annual global event featuring the sport’s top athletes.

More Partner Sports

  1. Synchronized Diving: Originating in the early 20th century, synchronized diving involves two divers performing identical or mirrored dives simultaneously. The sport is popular worldwide and has been part of the Olympic program since the 2000 Sydney Games. The International Swimming Federation (FINA) governs the sport and organizes events like the FINA Diving World Series and the FINA Diving World Cup.
  2. Synchronized Skating: Developed in the late 1950s in the United States, synchronized skating features teams of ice skaters performing choreographed routines. The sport is popular globally, particularly in North America and Europe. The International Skating Union (ISU) governs the sport and organizes competitions such as the ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships. Synchronized skating is not currently an Olympic sport.
  3. Ice Dance (Team): Ice dance is a discipline of figure skating that focuses on the rhythm, expression, and precise execution of dance steps on ice. It emerged in the early 20th century, with strong roots in European ballroom dancing. Ice dance is popular worldwide and has been part of the Olympic program since the 1976 Innsbruck Games. The International Skating Union (ISU) oversees the sport and holds annual events like the ISU World Figure Skating Championships, where ice dance is featured.
  4. Curling Mixed Doubles: Curling mixed doubles is a variation of traditional curling, played by one male and one female player per team. The sport originated in Switzerland in the early 2000s and has become increasingly popular globally. Curling mixed doubles was added to the Olympic program in the 2018 PyeongChang Games. The World Curling Federation (WCF) governs the sport and organizes the annual World Mixed Doubles Curling Championships.
  5. Two-Man Bobsleigh: With roots dating back to the late 19th century in Switzerland, two-man bobsleigh involves teams of two people navigating a sled down an ice track at high speeds. The sport is popular worldwide and has been part of the Winter Olympic program since the first Winter Games in 1924. The International Bobsleigh and Skeleton Federation (IBSF) oversees the sport and organizes events, including the IBSF World Championships.
  6. Tandem Cycling: Tandem cycling involves two cyclists riding together on a specially designed bicycle with two seats. The sport has roots in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and is popular globally. Tandem cycling is a Paralympic sport, included in the program since the first official Paralympic Games in Rome in 1960. The Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) governs both the able-bodied and Paralympic versions of the sport.
  7. Team Roping: Originating in the early 20th century in the United States, team roping is a popular rodeo event where two riders work together to lasso a steer. The sport is most popular in the United States and Canada, with events such as the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (NFR) and the Canadian Finals Rodeo (CFR) attracting large audiences. Team roping is not an Olympic sport.
  8. Pair Figure Skating: Pair figure skating, a discipline within figure skating, involves two skaters—one male and one female—performing various jumps, spins, lifts, and throws in a choreographed routine. The sport has roots in Europe dating back to the 19th century. Pair figure skating is popular globally and has been part of the Olympic program since the 1908 London Games. The International Skating Union (ISU) governs the sport and organizes events such as the ISU World Figure Skating Championships.
  9. Canoe Doubles: Canoe doubles, also known as C2, involves two athletes paddling a canoe in unison through whitewater rapids or on flat water. The sport’s origins can be traced back to North American indigenous peoples. Canoe doubles is popular worldwide and has been part of the Olympic program since the 1936 Berlin Games. The International Canoe Federation (ICF) governs the sport and organizes events such as the ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships and the ICF Canoe Sprint World Championships.
  10. Kayak Doubles: Kayak doubles, also known as K2, is a partnered version of kayaking where two athletes paddle a kayak together. Kayaking has roots in ancient Inuit and Aleut hunting practices. The sport is popular globally and has been part of the Olympic program since the 1936 Berlin Games. The International Canoe Federation (ICF) governs the sport and organizes events such as the ICF Canoe Sprint World Championships.
  11. Tandem Skydiving: Tandem skydiving, a form of skydiving where a student skydiver is connected to an experienced instructor via a harness, originated in the United States in the 1980s. It’s popular globally due to the accessibility for beginners. The United States Parachute Association (USPA) and the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) are the primary regulatory bodies. While not an Olympic sport, the FAI World Cup of Indoor Skydiving and various national championships represent major competitions.
  12. Ultimate Frisbee Doubles: Ultimate Frisbee Doubles is a modified version of Ultimate Frisbee, which was developed in the 1960s in the United States. The sport is played globally but is most popular in North America and Europe. The World Flying Disc Federation (WFDF) governs the sport, and top competitions include the WFDF World Ultimate Championships. Though not an Olympic sport, it is recognized by the International Olympic Committee.
  13. Spikeball Doubles: Spikeball, also known as roundnet, was created in the United States in the 1980s. Doubles format is the most common competitive format. The sport has grown in popularity, particularly in North America. Spikeball Roundnet Association governs the sport, with major competitions including the Spikeball Roundnet Nationals. Spikeball is not an Olympic sport.
  14. Footvolley: Footvolley, a blend of beach volleyball and soccer, was invented in Brazil in the 1960s. It is particularly popular in South American and European beachfront countries. The sport is governed by the Federation Internationale de Footvolley. Major competitions include the Footvolley World Cup and various regional tournaments. Footvolley is not an Olympic sport.
  15. Mixed Doubles Darts: Mixed Doubles Darts is a variant of traditional darts, which has origins dating back to medieval England. This version involves teams of one man and one woman. The World Darts Federation (WDF) governs the sport, with major competitions including the World Mixed Pairs championship. Darts is not an Olympic sport.
  16. Mixed Doubles Snooker: Mixed Doubles Snooker is a form of snooker involving teams of one man and one woman. Snooker originated in India in the late 19th century during British colonial rule. The World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association (WPBSA) governs the sport. There are no specific global mixed doubles tournaments, but regional competitions exist. Snooker is not an Olympic sport.
  17. Mixed Doubles Pool: Mixed Doubles Pool is a variant of traditional pool that involves teams of one man and one woman. Pool’s history is traced back to the 15th century in Europe. The World Pool-Billiard Association (WPA) governs the sport, and top mixed doubles competitions are usually held at the national level. Pool is not an Olympic sport.
  18. Team Golf: Team Golf is a variant of traditional golf, which has Scottish origins dating back to the 15th century. This form is played by teams and includes formats like foursomes and fourball. The International Golf Federation (IGF) governs the sport, and notable team tournaments include the Ryder Cup and the Solheim Cup. Golf returned to the Olympic Games in 2016 after a 112-year absence.
  19. Juggling Doubles: Juggling Doubles is a form of juggling where two performers juggle together, often passing objects between them. The art of juggling dates back thousands of years, with ancient civilizations like the Egyptians practicing it. The International Jugglers’ Association (IJA) governs the sport, with major competitions including the IJA Juggling Championships. Juggling is not an Olympic sport.
  20. Two-Person Sailing: Two-Person Sailing, or double-handed sailing, has been an integral part of the sport since its inception. Sailing has a rich history, dating back thousands of years. The International Sailing Federation (ISAF) governs the sport, with top two-person sailing competitions including the 470 class event in the Olympic Games, and the Ocean Race. Sailing has been part of the Olympic Games since 1900.

FAQ

What are the most popular partner sports?

Some of the most popular partner sports include beach volleyball, tennis, badminton, table tennis, squash, platform tennis, padel tennis, pickleball, synchronized swimming, and synchronized diving.

How many partner sports are listed in this article?

Our partner sports list features 30 unique sports that are played in pairs or teams.

Max is a sports enthusiast who loves all kinds of ball and water sports. He founded & runs stand-up-paddling.org (#1 German Paddleboarding Blog), played competitive Badminton and Mini Golf (competed on national level in Germany), started learning ‘real’ Golf and dabbled in dozens of other sports & activities.

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