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Roll into the world of strikes, spares, and splits where bowling reigns supreme!

From the neon-lit alleys of America to the competitive lanes in Asia, discover which countries are absolutely obsessed with bowling.

Are you ready to roll with the best of them? Here we go!

Countries where bowling is most popular:

  1. United States
  2. South Korea
  3. Japan
  4. Finland
  5. Sweden
  6. England (United Kingdom)
  7. Australia
  8. Malaysia
  9. Denmark
  10. Canada
  11. Singapore
Bowling

#1 United States

Bowling is deeply ingrained in American culture, with a rich history of both casual and competitive play.

The United States hosts numerous professional tournaments, including the Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) Tour, attracting top talent nationally and internationally. With thousands of bowling centers across the country, the sport remains a popular pastime and competitive endeavor for all ages.

#2 South Korea

In South Korea, bowling has seen a resurgence in popularity, becoming a trendy recreational activity among young people.

The country has produced several top international bowlers, and its national team regularly competes in and hosts international competitions, such as the Asian Games and World Bowling Championships.

#3 Japan

Pfc Nicholas Rhoades, Competitors from Hiroshima prefecture celebrate their bowling abilities with high-fives at the Strike Zone in Iwakuni, Japan, Oct 111016-M-GU681-282, scaling by sportsfoundation.org, CC0 1.0

Japan has a competitive bowling scene, with numerous high-tech bowling alleys that cater to both enthusiasts and professional players.

The Japan Professional Bowling Association organizes various national tournaments, and Japanese bowlers are known for their precision and technique, often ranking high in international competitions.

#4 Finland

Bowling in Finland is a popular sport with a strong competitive aspect. Finnish bowlers are renowned for their technical skills and have achieved success in European and World Championships.

The country has a well-established league system that fosters both amateur and professional growth in the sport.

#5 Sweden

Sweden has a vibrant bowling community, with the sport enjoying widespread popularity across all age groups.

The Swedish Bowling Federation oversees the sport’s development and organizes national leagues and championships, which are well-attended and followed. Swedish bowlers are competitive internationally, often participating in European and World tournaments.

#6 England (United Kingdom)

In England, bowling is a popular recreational sport, with numerous bowling alleys offering a mix of entertainment and competitive play.

The sport is governed by the British Tenpin Bowling Association, which organizes tournaments and events for all skill levels, promoting the sport across the UK.

#7 Australia

Bowling in Australia is a popular recreational activity that has seen competitive play rise through events like the Australian Tenpin Bowling National Championship.

Bowling alleys are widespread, facilitating social leagues and family outings. Participation at the grassroots level and international successes have secured bowling’s place in Australia’s sports culture, thriving in both casual and professional spheres.

#8 Malaysia

ChongkianMelaka International Bowling Center, scaling by sportsfoundation.org, CC BY-SA 4.0

Malaysia’s bowling landscape boasts significant success on the international stage, with its athletes earning accolades in World Bowling Championships. This recognition has spurred the sport’s growth domestically.

Urban centers and shopping malls often feature modern bowling facilities that encourage participation among Malaysians of all ages, enhancing the sport’s visibility and popularity across the country.

#9 Denmark

In Denmark, bowling enjoys a devoted following with numerous clubs and leagues across the nation. The sport is seen as an accessible and family-friendly pastime, which also offers serious competition at higher levels.

Danish bowlers have achieved commendable results in European and World Championships, showcasing the country’s competitive edge in the sport.

#10 Canada

D’Arcy NormanFive pin bowling boy, scaling by sportsfoundation.org, CC BY 2.0

Canada’s bowling scene is characterized by a strong community spirit and inclusivity. Bowling centers serve as community hubs, where leagues and tournaments are common, catering to various age groups and skill levels.

Canadian bowlers have participated with distinction in international events, which has helped to maintain the momentum and enthusiasm for the sport nationwide.

#11 Singapore

Singapore has a thriving bowling scene, supported by the Singapore Bowling Federation, which is dedicated to promoting the sport at all levels.

Singaporean bowlers are highly competitive on the international stage, often excelling in Asian and World Championships. The country’s bowling centers are state-of-the-art, facilitating both recreational play and high-level competition.

Bowling

FAQ

Which country is Bowling played the most?

Bowling is played the most in the United States, which has the largest number of bowling centers and leagues, reflecting its popularity and cultural significance within the country.

Which country watches Bowling the most?

The United States watches Bowling the most, with a substantial viewing audience for bowling events and a strong presence of the sport on television and online media platforms.

Where was Bowling originally played?

Bowling was originally played in Ancient Egypt, as evidenced by artifacts dating back to 3200 BC. For more insights into Bowling’s rich history, check out our Bowling history article.

Meet Rev, one of our dedicated team members who embodies the essence of sports passion. When heโ€™s not immersed in the world of sports content creation, Rev is busy honing his skills in esports and exploring the great outdoors through activities like hiking and basketball.

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